Diagnosis

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Acoustofluidic chip helps detect disease

Acoustofluidic chip helps detect disease
Scientists at Duke University have developed a way of concentrating nanoparticles inside a small device using only sound waves. This achievement may help introduce portable diagnostics that rely on attaching nanoparticles to biomarkers such as proteins and measuring how many find their targets. Nanoparticles tagged with fluorescent markers to make them easier to see are concentrated in a column by a new acoustic whirlpool device.
31st January 2017

Cell counting system aids diagnosis of meningitis

Cell counting system aids diagnosis of meningitis
French researchers from Grenoble Alpes University and Aix-Marseille University have developed an automated lens-free microscopy technique for counting and telling apart red and white blood cells within cerebrospinal fluid. Cerebrospinal fluid, gathered through a spinal tap, should be clear and have few, if any, blood cells within it. Patients with meningitis, due to inflammation and disruption of the membranes enveloping the brain, have white blood cells seeping into the cerebrospinal fluid (>10/μL).
31st January 2017

Deep learning algorithm helps identify skin cancer

Deep learning algorithm helps identify skin cancer
Universal access to health care was on the minds of computer scientists at Stanford when they set out to create an artificially intelligent diagnosis algorithm for skin cancer. They made a database of nearly 130,000 skin disease images and trained their algorithm to visually diagnose potential cancer. From the very first test, it performed with inspiring accuracy.
26th January 2017


Latest approach to the diagnostics of breast cancer

Latest approach to the diagnostics of breast cancer
An international group of scientists has created an approach to the diagnostics of breast cancer with the help of nanoparticles of porous silicone. A relatively new term for modern science, nanoteranostics is a conjunction of nanoscale diagnostics and therapeutic methods. One of the prospective methods of nanoteranostics is using nanoparticles of porous silicone for the detection of damaged cells.
18th January 2017

Technique could elucidate Alzheimer's and Parkinson's

Technique could elucidate Alzheimer's and Parkinson's
In research that could one day lead to advances against neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer's and Parkinson's, University of Michigan engineering researchers have demonstrated a technique for precisely measuring the properties of individual protein molecules floating in a liquid. Proteins are essential to the function of every cell. Measuring their properties in blood and other body fluids could unlock valuable information, as the molecules are a vital building block in the body.
18th January 2017

Hand-powered blood centrifuge aids diagnosis and treatment

Hand-powered blood centrifuge aids diagnosis and treatment
Here’s how to build a whirligig: Thread a loop of twine through two holes in a button. Grab the loop ends, then rhythmically pull. As the twine coils and uncoils, the button spins at a dizzying speed. Inspired by a toy, Stanford bioengineers have developed an inexpensive, human-powered blood centrifuge that will enable precise diagnosis and treatment of diseases like malaria, African sleeping sickness and tuberculosis in the poor, off-the-grid regions where these diseases are most prevalent.
11th January 2017

Probe offers accurate detection of biomarker for cancer

Probe offers accurate detection of biomarker for cancer
A technique offers better sensitivity and accuracy in detecting an essential biomarker of cancer and inflammatory diseases. Hypochlorous acid HOCl is one of the reactive molecules that our immune system dispatches to attack invading pathogens or potentially harmful irritants. The oxidant is also generated as a result of tissue damage that causes – or even exacerbates – inflammatory diseases such as lung and liver disease, heart attacks, atherosclerosis and neurodegenerative disorder.
8th December 2016

Computer modelling could lead to prostate cancer detection

Computer modelling could lead to prostate cancer detection
Research coauthored by Brigham Young University researchers may lead to a more accurate system for early detection, diagnosis, and treatment of prostate cancer. The study, published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, details a computer model that uses medical images to reproduce the growth patterns of prostate cancer on the anatomy of a patient's prostate.
22nd November 2016

3D video with intelligent software monitors sleep disorders

The usual method of recording periodic leg movements in sleep for people with sleep disorders is to use electromyography (EMG), an electrophysiological method used in neurological diagnosis that measures muscle activity. However, the cables that this method requires can interfere with the patient's sleep and electrodes can become detached, thereby compromising the quality of the data.
17th November 2016

Tiny electronic device monitors heart and recognises speech

Tiny electronic device monitors heart and recognises speech
  Researchers from the University of Colorado Boulder and Northwestern University have developed a tiny, soft and wearable acoustic sensor that measures vibrations in the human body, allowing them to monitor human heart health and recognise spoken words.
17th November 2016


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