Diagnosis

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Graphene-based sensor could improve diagnosis of asthma

Graphene-based sensor could improve diagnosis of asthma
Rutgers University-New Brunswick scientists have created a graphene-based sensor that could lead to earlier detection of looming asthma attacks and improve the management of asthma and other respiratory diseases, preventing hospitalisations and deaths. The sensor paves the way for the development of devices - possibly resembling fitness trackers like the Fitbit - which people could wear and then know when and at what dosage to take their medication.
22nd May 2017

Sensors can detect disease markers in breath

Sensors can detect disease markers in breath
A small, thin square of an organic plastic that can detect disease markers in breath or toxins in a building's air could soon be the basis of portable, disposable sensor devices. By riddling the thin plastic films with pores, University of Illinois researchers made the devices sensitive enough to detect at levels that are far too low to smell, yet are important to human health.
19th May 2017

AI tech helps speed up detection of lung cancer

AI tech helps speed up detection of lung cancer
Infervision has introduced its deep learning solution to help radiologists identify suspicious lesions and nodules in lung cancer patients faster than ever before. The Infervision AI platform is the world's first to reshape the workflow of radiologists and it is already showing dramatic results at several top hospitals in China. The company founder, Chen Kuan, will present a talk on the company and its use of AI for medical diagnoses at the NVIDIA GPU Tech Conference in San Jose.
17th May 2017


Virtual patients help aspiring doctors learn empathy

Virtual patients help aspiring doctors learn empathy
  Delivering bad news in a caring way — and coping with a patient’s reaction — is a key skill for doctors. Intuitive technology is helping medical students learn the best approaches.
15th May 2017

Project to target inflammatory bowel diseases

Leti has announced a European Union project to develop a nanotherapy targeting the molecules involved in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), such as Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis. An estimated 3 million people in Europe, mostly adolescents and young adults, have been diagnosed with inflammatory bowel diseases, which are chronic disorders of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract caused by immune reactions.
12th May 2017

Computer identifies breast cancers on digital tissue slides

A deep-learning computer network developed through research led by Case Western Reserve University was 100% accurate in determining whether invasive forms of breast cancer were present in whole biopsy slides. Looking closer, the network correctly made the same determination in each individual pixel of the slide 97% of the time, rendering near-exact delineations of the tumours.
11th May 2017

MR/RT system debuts at ESTRO 36

MR/RT system debuts at ESTRO 36
At the 36th ESTRO (European Society for Radiotherapy & Oncology) meeting, Elekta introduced Elekta Unity, a MR/RT system that integrates a premium diagnostic quality (1.5 Tesla) MRI scanner with an advanced linear accelerator and intelligent software. Elekta Unity is expected to deliver precisely-targeted radiation doses while simultaneously capturing the highest-quality MR images, which will allow clinicians to visualise tumors at any time and adapt the treatment accordingly.
9th May 2017

Pac-Man-like CRISPR enzymes could aid diagnosis

Pac-Man-like CRISPR enzymes could aid diagnosis
University of California, Berkeley, researchers have described 10 new CRISPR enzymes that, once activated, behave like Pac-Man to chew up RNA in a way that could be used as sensitive detectors of infectious viruses. The new CRISPR enzymes are variants of a CRISPR protein, Cas13a, which the UC Berkeley researchers reported last September in Nature could be used to detect specific sequences of RNA, such as from a virus.
8th May 2017

Introducing infection-detection tech into hospital ICUs

Introducing infection-detection tech into hospital ICUs
In the face of growing crises related to antibiotic resistance and hospital-acquired infections, a UW–Madison spinoff called Isomark is working to introduce a new infection-detection technology into hospital intensive care units. Isomark’s system measures carbon isotopes in exhaled breath. Without even touching the patient, it can offer the earliest warning of severe bacterial infection, says founder Mark Cook, a professor of animal science at the University of Wisconsin–Madison.
25th April 2017

Spirometer with wireless connection receives FDA clearance

Spirometer with wireless connection receives FDA clearance
Monitored Therapeutics has received FDA 510(k) clearance for its GoSpiro Home Spirometer. This is the first spirometer that was specifically developed as a home-use wireless connected spirometer that works with a wide range of smartphones, tablets or PCs. Michael Taylor, Chief Development Officer, pointed out that "The GoSpiro is the only spirometer currently on the market that has met the latest and more stringent ISO and FDA device requirements for home use."
21st April 2017


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LASER World of PHOTONICS 2017
26th June 2017
Germany Messe Munchen