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University of Wisconsin-Madison articles

Displaying 1 - 20 of 32

Old bones lead to strategy for drug delivery

Old bones lead to strategy for drug delivery
  Taking a hint from archaeology, where centuries-old bones and teeth have been found to harbor intact biological proteins, a team of Wisconsin scientists has devised a way to deliver drugs and other therapeutic agents by coating medical devices with a nanostructured mineral sheath that mimics bone.
4th July 2017

Machine learning can help diagnose genetic disorders

Machine learning can help diagnose genetic disorders
In a new study published in Scientific Reports, the researchers used machine learning to analyse hundreds of voice recordings and accurately identify individuals with a genetic condition known as fragile X premutation, which increases the risk of developing neurodegenerative disorders, infertility or having a child with fragile X syndrome.
12th June 2017

Stem cells yield blueprint for body’s vasculature

Stem cells yield blueprint for body’s vasculature
In the average adult human, there are an estimated 100,000 miles of capillaries, veins and arteries — the plumbing that carries life-sustaining blood to every part of the body, including vital organs such as the heart and the brain. When things go wrong with vasculature, the result can be a heart attack, stroke or other life-threatening or chronic condition.
31st May 2017


Improving medical imaging and patient outcomes

Improving medical imaging and patient outcomes
Since the 1980s, GE has supported research into imaging technologies at UW–Madison. The latest agreement, a 10-year, $34-million contract, began in 2012 to fund radiology and medical physics researchers, who work on campus with the company’s newest CT, PET and MR scanners. “We have relationships globally, but UW–Madison is practically in a class of its own in those relationships,” says Jörg Debatin, vice-president, chief medical officer, and chief technology officer at GE Healthcare.
22nd May 2017

Smartphone app aimed at preventing substance abuse relapse

Smartphone app aimed at preventing substance abuse relapse
A UW–Madison research team was selected as one of seven finalists in Harvard’s Innovation in American Government competition, for its work in creating a smartphone application that helps people recover from addiction to alcohol and other substances. The app, called Addiction CHESS (A-CHESS), was created by the Center for Health Enhancement Systems Studies.
19th May 2017

Replicating the patient's blood-brain barrier in the lab dish

Replicating the patient's blood-brain barrier in the lab dish
  The blood-brain barrier is biology's proverbial double-edged sword. An impermeable shield of endothelial cells that protects our brains from toxins and other threats that may lurk in circulating blood, the barrier can also exclude therapeutic drugs and, at times, essential biomolecules required for healthy brain development.
17th May 2017

Technology aims to accelerate learning

Technology aims to accelerate learning
The adage “put your thinking caps on” might evoke visions of an elementary classroom, where a teacher has just admonished cherubic little learners about to embark on a particularly difficult academic adventure. In today’s high-stakes world, where we all need to think, learn or act quickly, the adage still rings true: Mastering a new task, skill or information often takes the right environment, mindset, sharp focus and lots of hard work, repetition and time.
27th April 2017

Introducing infection-detection tech into hospital ICUs

Introducing infection-detection tech into hospital ICUs
In the face of growing crises related to antibiotic resistance and hospital-acquired infections, a UW–Madison spinoff called Isomark is working to introduce a new infection-detection technology into hospital intensive care units. Isomark’s system measures carbon isotopes in exhaled breath. Without even touching the patient, it can offer the earliest warning of severe bacterial infection, says founder Mark Cook, a professor of animal science at the University of Wisconsin–Madison.
25th April 2017

Digital inhaler add-on offers slick aid to asthma care

Digital inhaler add-on offers slick aid to asthma care
  What do you get by marrying an asthma inhaler to a wireless monitor and a smartphone app? Plenty, says David Van Sickle, a medical anthropologist who specialises in respiratory disease. In 2011, Van Sickle created a spinoff called Propeller Health while he was working on respiratory disease prevention at UW Health in Madison.
20th April 2017

Experiment yields clue to devastating neurological disease

Experiment yields clue to devastating neurological disease
  After a 29-year quest, Ian Duncan, a professor of veterinary medicine at the University of Wisconsin–Madison, has finally pinpointed the cause of a serious neurologic disease in a colony of rats. His new study, now online in the journal Annals of Neurology, is more than the conclusion of a personal and intellectual odyssey, however.
20th April 2017

Text-mining tool turbocharges biomedical pursuits

Text-mining tool turbocharges biomedical pursuits
With about 100 lines of code, a Morgridge Institute for Research team has unleashed a fast, simple and predictive text-mining tool that may turbocharge big biomedical pursuits such as drug repurposing and stem cell treatments. The algorithm, named “KinderMiner” by its inventors, has been put to use exploring one of the largest single archives of research journal papers, Europe PubMed Central.
30th March 2017

Engineer aims to grow spinal tissue in lab

Engineer aims to grow spinal tissue in lab
For a soldier who suffered a spinal cord injury on the battlefield, the promise of regenerative medicine is to fully repair the resulting limb paralysis. But that hope is still years from reality. Not only powerful, but efficient. Studying diseases in lab-created tissue may help reduce the price tag — now roughly $1.8 billion — for bringing a new drug to market, which is one of the reasons Ashton received a National Science Foundation CAREER Award for advancing tissue engineering of the human spinal cord.
22nd March 2017

Plant-based 3D scaffolds can create biomedical implants

Plant-based 3D scaffolds can create biomedical implants
  Borrowing from nature is an age-old theme in science. Form and function go hand-in-hand in the natural world and the structures created by plants and animals are only rarely improved on by humans.
21st March 2017

Smartphone technology could combat workplace injuries

Smartphone technology could combat workplace injuries
Manufacturing industries rely on the efforts of factory employees who work daily to make, package, prepare and deliver the products we find on our shelves. That’s a lot of physical effort, and the strain can lead to various injuries, such as carpal tunnel syndrome or tendonitis in the wrists, arms and shoulders. Risk of injury is hard on workers, and can create costs to employers for workers’ compensation, lost time and reduced productivity.
16th March 2017

Scientists find key cues to regulate bone-building cells

Scientists find key cues to regulate bone-building cells
The prospect of regenerating bone lost to cancer or trauma is a step closer to the clinic as University of Wisconsin–Madison scientists have identified two proteins found in bone marrow as key regulators of the master cells responsible for making new bone. In a study published online in the journal Stem Cell Reports, a team of UW–Madison scientists reports that the proteins govern the activity of mesenchymal stem cells — precursor cells found in marrow that make bone and cartilage.
3rd February 2017

Centre helps make radiation treatment for cancer safer

Centre helps make radiation treatment for cancer safer
A patient preparing for cancer treatment that uses radiation has plenty to worry about. Getting the right treatment every time — just the right dose in just the right place — should be taken for granted. And yet in radiotherapy, as in every other human activity, errors happen. Tracking down and eliminating errors in a way that simultaneously prevents further problems is the stock-in-trade of the Center for the Assessment of Radiological Sciences, an organisation born at the University of Wisconsin–Madison in 2012.
3rd February 2017

Discovering how the brain resets during sleep

Discovering how the brain resets during sleep
  Striking electron microscope pictures from inside the brains of mice suggest what happens in our own brain every day: Our synapses – the junctions between nerve cells – grow strong and large during the stimulation of daytime, then shrink by nearly 20% while we sleep, creating room for more growth and learning the next day.
3rd February 2017

Gene editing observation to develop precision therapies

Gene editing observation to develop precision therapies
University of Wisconsin–Madison engineers have developed methods to observe gene editing in action, and they’re putting those capabilities to work to improve genetic engineering techniques. “Ultimately, the knowledge we gain from this project has the potential to set the foundation for new preclinical platforms in precision medicine,” says Krishanu Saha, an assistant professor of biomedical engineering at UW–Madison and the principal investigator on the project.
25th January 2017

Spinoff harnesses stem cells for medical uses

Spinoff harnesses stem cells for medical uses
Stem Pharm, a University of Wisconsin–Madison startup built on inventions related to the growth and control of stem cells, received a $290,000 grant from the National Institutes of Health. The grant will support Stem Pharm’s continued development of sophisticated biological materials that can efficiently manufacture stem cells for medical use. Stem Pharm’s custom materials support growing human cells to evaluate potential drugs or serve as replacement tissues for regenerative medicine.
23rd January 2017

UW-Madison launches Microbiome Initiative

UW-Madison launches Microbiome Initiative
A UW–Madison Microbiome Initiative comes with $1 million in grant funding administered by the vice chancellor for research and graduate education to support interdisciplinary research, infrastructure, and research community enhancements related to the microbiome. “Microbiome science has the potential to revolutionise areas such as health care, agriculture, biomanufacturing, environmental management, and more,” says Marsha Mailick, UW–Madison’s vice chancellor for research and graduate education.
12th January 2017


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