University of Cambridge

Address:
Becky Wieczorek
Festivals PR Officer
Office of External Affairs and Communications
University of Cambridge
The Pitt Building
Trumpington Street
Cambridge
CB2 1RP
United Kingdom

Phone: 01223 339 670

Web: www.cam.ac.uk/science-festival


University of Cambridge articles

Displaying 1 - 16 of 16

'Getting in sync' with your baby

'Getting in sync' with your baby
Making eye contact with an infant makes adults’ and babies’ brainwaves ‘get in sync’ with each other – which is likely to support communication and learning – according to researchers at the University of Cambridge. When a parent and infant interact, various aspects of their behaviour can synchronise, including their gaze, emotions and heartrate, but little is known about whether their brain activity also synchronises – and what the consequences of this might be.
29th November 2017

Tiny liver tumours created in a dish for the first time

Tiny liver tumours created in a dish for the first time
Scientists have created mini biological models of human primary liver cancers, known as organoids, in the lab for the first time. In a paper published in Nature Medicine, the tiny laboratory models of tumours were used to identify a new drug that could potentially treat certain types of liver cancer. Primary liver cancer is the second most lethal cancer worldwide.
16th November 2017

Keyhole surgery could be the most efficient procedure for ruptured aneurysm

Keyhole surgery could be the most efficient procedure for ruptured aneurysm
The use of keyhole surgery to repair ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm is both clinically and cost effective and should be adopted more widely, concludes a randomised trial published by The BMJ. This is the first randomised trial comparing the use of keyhole (endovascular) aneurysm repair versus traditional open surgery to repair ruptured aneurysm, with full midterm follow-up.
15th November 2017


Impressive cognitive ability might make you feel sheepish

Impressive cognitive ability might make you feel sheepish
Sheep can be trained to recognise human faces from photographic portraits – and can even identify the picture of their handler without prior training – according to new research from scientists at the University of Cambridge. The study, published in the journal Royal Society: Open Science, is part a series of tests given to the sheep to monitor their cognitive abilities.
8th November 2017

Skin assists in controlling blood pressure

Skin assists in controlling blood pressure
  Skin plays a special role in helping regulate blood pressure and heart rate, according to scientists at the University of Cambridge and the Karolinska Institute, Sweden. While this discovery was made in mice, the researchers believe it is likely to be true also in humans.
26th October 2017

Genetics of breast cancer provides clues to its mechanisms

Genetics of breast cancer provides clues to its mechanisms
Seventy-two new genetic variants that contribute to the risk of developing breast cancer have been identified by a major international collaboration involving hundreds of researchers worldwide. Of these variants, reported in the journals Nature and Nature Genetics, 65 are common variants that predispose to breast cancer and a further seven predispose specifically to oestrogen-receptor negative breast cancer – the subset of cases that do not respond to hormonal therapies, such as the drug tamoxifen.
24th October 2017

Synthetic organs, nanobots and DNA ‘scissors’: the future of medicine

Nanobots that patrol our bodies, killer immune cells hunting and destroying cancer cells, biological scissors that cut out defective genes: these are just some of technologies that Cambridge researchers are developing which are set to revolutionise medicine in the future. In a new film to coincide with the recent launch of the Cambridge Academy of Therapeutic Sciences, researchers discuss some of the most exciting developments in medical research and set out their vision for the next 50 years.
12th October 2017

Type 2 diabetes can be managed online

Type 2 diabetes can be managed online
People with type 2 diabetes could improve their health by using a new web-based self-management tool, according to new research. The results, published in BMJ Open, and funded by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR), come from the first UK-based trial of its kind and show that patients using the HeLP-Diabetes programme have better diabetes control after 12 months. “Diabetes is an NHS priority, with around 4 million people in England living with type 2 diabetes.
28th September 2017

Diagnostic test will help eradicate African sleeping sickness

Diagnostic test will help eradicate African sleeping sickness
  A new diagnostic test developed from research at the Universities of Cambridge and Dundee has been launched with the aim of helping eliminate the disease known as African sleeping sickness.
13th September 2017

The first molecular test for psychiatric disorders

The first molecular test for psychiatric disorders
Current diagnosis of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder is challenging due to a complex range of symptoms. Early diagnosis is the key to vastly improved outcomes for patients. The EU funded SCHIZDX (Developing minimally invasive, tools and technologies for high throughput, low cost molecular assays for the early diagnosis of schizophrenia and other psychiatric disorders) project has developed the first molecular test for the diagnosis of schizophrenia, VeriPsych.
11th September 2017

Collaborations aim to tackle global food security

Collaborations aim to tackle global food security
Two major research collaborations led by the University of Cambridge have been awarded almost £15 million in funding, the Minister of State for Universities and Science, Jo Johnson MP, has announced during a visit to Cambridge’s Sainsbury Laboratory. The two collaborations are focused on food security in India and public health in Bangladesh and will see researchers from the UK and developing countries working together as equal partners.
24th July 2017

Artificial bile ducts developed in lab

Artificial bile ducts developed in lab
Cambridge scientists have developed a new method for growing and transplanting artificial bile ducts that could in future be used to help treat liver disease in children, reducing the need for liver transplantation. In research published in the journal Nature Medicine, the researchers grew 3D cellular structure which, once transplanted into mice, developed into normal, functioning bile ducts.
4th July 2017

Visualising the genome with 3D structures

Visualising the genome with 3D structures
Scientists have determined the first 3D structures of intact mammalian genomes from individual cells, showing how the DNA from all the chromosomes intricately folds to fit together inside the cell nuclei. Researchers from the University of Cambridge and the MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology used a combination of imaging and up to 100,000 measurements of where different parts of the DNA are close to each other to examine the genome in a mouse embryonic stem cell.
13th March 2017

Artificial pancreas to become available by 2018

The artificial pancreas - a device which monitors blood glucose in patients with type 1 diabetes and then automatically adjusts levels of insulin entering the body - is likely to be available by 2018, conclude authors of a paper in Diabetologia (the journal of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes). Issues such as speed of action of the forms of insulin used, reliability, convenience and accuracy of glucose monitors plus cybersecurity to protect devices from hacking, are among the issues that are being addressed.
1st July 2016

Cambridge Uni team publishes research to improve elderly living

Cambridge Uni team publishes research to improve elderly living
A team of post-graduate students from the University of Cambridge has published research with the potential to transform the lives of millions of older people around the world. The team has made a genuine contribution to society, an experience that will stay with them for the rest of their careers.
25th June 2016

Graphene shown to safely interact with neurons in the brain

Graphene shown to safely interact with neurons in the brain
Researchers have successfully demonstrated how it is possible to interface graphene – a two-dimensional form of carbon – with neurons, or nerve cells, while maintaining the integrity of these vital cells. The work may be used to build graphene-based electrodes that can safely be implanted in the brain, offering promise for the restoration of sensory functions for amputee or paralysed patients, or for individuals with motor disorders such as epilepsy or Parkinson’s disease.
16th February 2016


Sign up to view our publications

Sign up

Sign up to view our downloads

Sign up

CES 2018
9th January 2018
United States of America Las Vegas, Nevada
Developing wearable products: technology and opportunities
17th January 2018
United Kingdom Cocoon Networks, London
Smart Mobility Executive Forum
12th February 2018
Germany Berlin
embedded world 2018
27th February 2018
Germany Nuremberg
Industry 4.0 Summit 2018
28th February 2018
United Kingdom Manchester