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University of California, San Diego articles

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Smartphone case offers blood glucose monitoring on the go

Smartphone case offers blood glucose monitoring on the go
Engineers at the University of California San Diego have developed a smartphone case and app that will make it easier for patients to record and track their blood glucose readings, whether they’re at home or on the go. Currently, checking blood sugar levels can be a hassle for people with diabetes, especially when they have to pack their glucose monitoring kits around with them every time they leave the house.
11th December 2017

Stretchable biofuel cells extract energy from sweat

Stretchable biofuel cells extract energy from sweat
A team of engineers has developed stretchable fuel cells that extract energy from sweat and are capable of powering electronics, such as LEDs and Bluetooth radios. The biofuel cells generate 10 times more power per surface area than any existing wearable biofuel cells. The devices could be used to power a range of wearable devices. The epidermal biofuel cells are a major breakthrough in the field, which has been struggling with making the devices that are stretchable enough and powerful enough.
29th August 2017

Micromotors safely release antibiotics in the stomach

Micromotors safely release antibiotics in the stomach
Nanoengineers at the University of California San Diego have demonstrated for the first time using micromotors to treat a bacterial infection in the stomach. These tiny vehicles, each about half the width of a human hair, swim rapidly throughout the stomach while neutralising gastric acid and then release their cargo of antibiotics at the desired pH. Researchers published their findings in Nature Communications.
18th August 2017


3D printing to help train surgeons and shorten surgery times

3D printing to help train surgeons and shorten surgery times
A team of engineers and pediatric orthopedic surgeons are using 3D printing to help train surgeons and shorten surgeries for the most common hip disorder found in children ages 9 to 16. In a recent study, researchers showed that allowing surgeons to prep on a 3D-printed model of the patient's hip joint cut by about 25% the amount of time needed for surgery when compared to a control group.
2nd August 2017

Low cost glove translates sign language

Low cost glove translates sign language
At the University of California San Diego engineers have developed a low-cost electronic glove capable of understanding sign language. A user simply puts it on and can sign away, with the glove wirelessly transmitting what it’s interpreting to another device to be read out or for the words to appear on a screen. The cost of all the parts comes out to less than $100, including the printed stretchable electronic sensors that are attached to the top of the fingers.
14th July 2017

Cancer cells communicate with others to boost survival

Cancer cells communicate with others to boost survival
  Researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine report that cancer cells appear to communicate to other cancer cells, activating an internal mechanism that boosts resistance to common chemotherapies and promotes tumour survival. The findings are published online in Science Signaling.
7th June 2017

Device maps the brain during surgery

Device maps the brain during surgery
  Researchers have developed a device to map the brain during surgery and distinguish between healthy and diseased tissues. The device provides higher resolution neural readings than existing tools used in the clinic and could enable doctors to perform safer, more precise brain surgeries.
30th May 2017

Chemists develop the ultimate natural sunscreen

Chemists develop the ultimate natural sunscreen
Chemists, materials scientists and nanoengineers at UC San Diego have created what may be the ultimate natural sunscreen. In a paper published in the American Chemical Society journal ACS Central Science, they report the development of nanoparticles that mimic the behavior of natural melanosomes, melanin-producing cell structures that protect our skin, eyes and other tissues from the harmful effects of ultraviolet radiation.
17th May 2017

Engineered bone marrow could improve transplants

Engineered bone marrow could improve transplants
Engineers at the University of California San Diego have developed biomimetic bone tissues that could one day provide new bone marrow for patients needing transplants. Bone marrow transplants are used to treat patients with bone marrow disease. Before a transplant, a patient is first given doses of radiation, sometimes in combination with drugs, to kill off any existing stem cells in the patient's bone marrow.
9th May 2017

Using CRISPR to restore visual function

Using CRISPR to restore visual function
Using the gene-editing tool CRISPR/Cas9, researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine and Shiley Eye Institute at UC San Diego Health, with colleagues in China, have reprogrammed mutated rod photoreceptors to become functioning cone photoreceptors, reversing cellular degeneration and restoring visual function in two mouse models of retinitis pigmentosa. The findings are published in Cell Research.
24th April 2017

Nanowires accelerate development of neurological drugs

Nanowires accelerate development of neurological drugs
A team led by engineers at the University of California San Diego has developed nanowires that can record the electrical activity of neurons in fine detail. The nanowire technology could one day serve as a platform to screen drugs for neurological diseases and could enable researchers to better understand how single cells communicate in large neuronal networks.
19th April 2017

Nano-implant could help restore sight

Nano-implant could help restore sight
A team of engineers at the University of California San Diego and La Jolla-based startup Nanovision Biosciences have developed the nanotechnology and wireless electronics for a new type of retinal prosthesis that brings research a step closer to restoring the ability of neurons in the retina to respond to light. The researchers demonstrated this response to light in a rat retina interfacing with a prototype of the device in vitro.
14th March 2017

Nanoengineers 3D print biomimetic blood vessel networks

Nanoengineers 3D print biomimetic blood vessel networks
Nanoengineers at the University of California San Diego have 3D printed a lifelike, functional blood vessel network that could pave the way toward artificial organs and regenerative therapies. The research, led by nanoengineering professor Shaochen Chen, addresses one of the biggest challenges in tissue engineering: creating lifelike tissues and organs with functioning vasculature and do so safely when implanted inside the body.
3rd March 2017

A non-invasive method to detect infections in prostheses

A non-invasive method to detect infections in prostheses
  Engineers at the University of California San Diego have developed a non-invasive method to detect infections in prostheses used for amputees, as well as for knee, hip and other joint replacements. The method, which is at the proof of concept stage, consists of a simple imaging technique and an innovative material to coat the prostheses.
14th December 2016

Catheter lets doctors see inside arteries for first time

Removing plaque from clogged arteries is a common procedure that can save and improve lives. This treatment approach was recently made even safer and more effective with a new, high-tech catheter that allows cardiologists to see inside the arteries for the first time, cutting out only the diseased tissue. Interventional cardiologists at Sulpizio Cardiovascular Center at UC San Diego Health are the first in the region to use this technology.
28th September 2016

Nanobowls magnetically deliver drugs to specific organs

Nanobowls magnetically deliver drugs to specific organs
Imagine a device that could transport drugs to any diseased site in the body with the help of a small magnet. Researchers at the University of California San Diego have taken a step toward that goal by developing nano-sized vessels, called nanobowls, that could be filled with drug molecules and controlled with magnets for guided delivery to specific tissues and organs, including cancer tissue, small organs such as the pancreas and hard to access areas like the brain.
8th August 2016

Synthetic membranes could mimic living cells

Synthetic membranes could mimic living cells
Biochemists at the University of California San Diego have developed artificial cell membranes that grow and remodel themselves in a manner similar to that of living mammalian cells. The achievement, detailed in a paper published in this week's issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, follows the successful design last year in the same laboratory of artificial, or synthetic, cell membranes capable of sustaining continual growth.
19th July 2016

Biosensor chip can detect DNA mutations

Biosensor chip can detect DNA mutations
Bioengineers at the University of California, San Diego have developed an electrical graphene chip capable of detecting mutations in DNA. Researchers say the technology could one day be used in various medical applications such as blood-based tests for early cancer screening, monitoring disease biomarkers and real-time detection of viral and microbial sequences. The advance was published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
14th June 2016

Model offers therapeutic target for pancreatic cancer

Model offers therapeutic target for pancreatic cancer
In a new study, published in Nature, researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine and Moores Cancer Center, together with colleagues at Keio University, the University of Nebraska and Ionis Pharmaceuticals describe an innovative model that not only allowed them to track drug resistance in vivo, but also revealed a therapeutic target, which early testing suggests could provide a strategy to arrest pancreatic cancer growth.
6th June 2016

Stem cells restore vision after cataract surgery

Stem cells restore vision after cataract surgery
Researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine and Shiley Eye Institute, with colleagues in China, have developed a new, regenerative medicine approach to remove congenital cataracts in infants, permitting remaining stem cells to regrow functional lenses.
10th March 2016


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