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The University of Chicago articles

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Flu forecasting tool uses evolution for prophylaxis purposes

Flu forecasting tool uses evolution for prophylaxis purposes
Each year, public health officials monitor the spread of influenza to identify which flu strains need to go into that year's vaccines and where outbreaks will occur. But it can be difficult to predict how bad a particular flu season will be until people actually start getting sick. A new flu forecasting tool built by scientists at the University of Chicago aims to make better predictions by combining data about how the virus spreads with an estimate of how much the current virus evolved compared to recent years.
26th October 2017

DNA nanopackages help reveal how neurons work

DNA nanopackages help reveal how neurons work
A team of scientists from the University of Chicago designed a way to use microscopic capsules made out of DNA to deliver a payload of tiny molecules directly into a cell. The technique, detailed in Nature Nanotechnology, gives scientists an opportunity to understand certain interactions among cells that have previously been hard to track. “It’s really a molecular platform,” said Yamuna Krishnan, professor in chemistry and co-author of the study.
11th September 2017

Big data shows unexpected connections between diseases

Big data shows unexpected connections between diseases
Using health insurance claims data from more than 480,000 people in nearly 130,000 families, researchers at the University of Chicago have created a classification of common diseases based on how often they occur among genetically-related individuals. Researchers hope the work, published in Nature Genetics, will help physicians make better diagnoses and treat root causes instead of symptoms.
8th August 2017


Boosting insulin levels with CRISPR and skin grafts

Boosting insulin levels with CRISPR and skin grafts
A research team based at the University of Chicago has overcome challenges that have limited gene therapy and demonstrated how their novel approach with skin transplantation could enable a wide range of gene-based therapies to treat many human diseases. In the journal Cell Stem Cell, the researchers provide "proof-of-concept." They describe a new form of gene-therapy - administered through skin transplants - to treat two related and extremely common human ailments: type-2 diabetes and obesity.
7th August 2017

Computer model simulates sense of touch

Computer model simulates sense of touch
Neuroscientists from the University of Chicago have developed a computer model that can simulate the response of nerves in the hand to any pattern of touch stimulation on the skin. The tool reconstructs the response of more than 12,500 nerve fibres with millisecond precision, taking into account the mechanics of the skin as it presses up against and moves across objects. The software will allow scientists to see how entire populations of nerve fibres respond when we interact with objects.
27th June 2017

A way to enable rapid screening of anti-cancer compounds

A way to enable rapid screening of anti-cancer compounds
A chemistry graduate student at UChicago, Di Liu devised a way to make tiny knotted and interlocked chemical structures that have been impossible for chemists to fabricate until now, and he invented a way that those knots might be used to quickly screen hundreds of chemicals for fighting cancer. Many chemicals have knots or links as part of their structure. But synthesising new substances that tie themselves in knots at the molecular scale is prodigiously difficult.
12th August 2016

Injectable biomaterial to be used for neuronal control

Injectable biomaterial to be used for neuronal control
In the campy 1966 science fiction movie "Fantastic Voyage," scientists miniaturise a submarine with themselves inside and travel through the body of a colleague to break up a potentially fatal blood clot. Right. Micro-humans aside, imagine the inflammation that metal sub would cause. Ideally, injectable or implantable medical devices should not only be small and electrically functional, they should be soft, like the body tissues with which they interact.
4th July 2016


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