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Technische Universität München articles

Displaying 1 - 20 of 21

Helping sportspeople produce optimum results

Golfers wanting to shoot below par or tennis players looking to smash their way past opponents should focus on their backswing in order to perfect new techniques quickly, research suggests. Academics at the University of Plymouth and the Technical University of Munich assessed the speed at which people learned the basic skills which allowed them to achieve consistent results.
15th August 2017

Optimising immunisation with T cell receptors

Optimising immunisation with T cell receptors
When T cells encounter an antigen, they proliferate and produce various types of daughter cells. A team at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has now refuted the prevailing hypothesis that this immune response is largely predetermined by the individual structure of the T cell receptor. Instead, the influence of the T cell receptor can be described only in probabilistic terms. Such mathematical models may help to improve the design of future vaccination strategies.
1st August 2017

Porcine gastric molecule creates coating for contact lenses

Porcine gastric molecule creates coating for contact lenses
After a long day of working at the computer, scratchy contact lenses are not only painful, over longer periods of time they can also damage ocular tissue. Relief may be in sight from a natural mucus component referred to as a mucin. A team from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has now succeeded in demonstrating that contact lenses coated with purified porcine gastric mucin do not cause damage to the eye anymore.
1st August 2017


Substance improves brain function and fights dementia

Substance improves brain function and fights dementia
The protein amyloid beta is believed to be the major cause of Alzheimer’s disease. Substances that reduce the production of amyloid beta, such as BACE inhibitors, are therefore promising candidates for new drug treatments. A team at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has recently demonstrated that one such BACE inhibitor reduces the amount of amyloid beta in the brain. By doing so, it can restore the normal function of nerve cells and significantly improve memory performance.
28th July 2017

TUM leads major project in digital medicine

TUM leads major project in digital medicine
  The aim of the DIFUTURE (Data Integration for Future Medicine) project is to collate and analyse digital patient data with a view to improving our understanding of diseases and allowing doctors to reach the individual right decisions faster.
14th July 2017

Antibody against carcinogenic substance deciphered

Antibody against carcinogenic substance deciphered
A team led by Prof. Arne Skerra from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has deciphered the binding mechanism of an antibody to benzopyrene — a discovery that could pave the way for an easier method to identify and, hence, remove the toxin. During the incomplete combustion of organic substances polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are created. The most well-known of these substances is benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) due to its high toxicity and its facile identification.
12th July 2017

Image correction software simplifies quantification of stem cells

Image correction software simplifies quantification of stem cells
Today, tracking the development of individual cells and spotting the associated factors under the microscope is nothing unusual. However, impairments like shadows or changes in the background complicate the interpretation of data. Now, researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and the Helmholtz Zentrum München have developed a software that corrects images to make hitherto hidden development steps visible.
21st June 2017

Rapid test improves malaria diagnosis

Rapid test improves malaria diagnosis
Diagnosing malaria has been a very time-consuming and error-prone process up to now. Together with his Dutch colleague Jan van den Boogaart, Professor Oliver Hayden from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has now developed an automated rapid blood test that provides an accurate diagnosis in almost 100% of cases. The researchers were presented with the European Inventor Award, which honors outstanding inventors from Europe and the rest of the world, for the development of the new method.
19th June 2017

Approach uses RNA in search for genetic triggers

Approach uses RNA in search for genetic triggers
In about half of all patients with rare hereditary disorders, it is still unclear what exact position of the genome is responsible for their condition. One reason for this is the enormous quantity of information encoded in human genes. Scientists from the fields of informatics and medicine have now joined forces to find a solution: A team at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and Helmholtz Zentrum München has developed a method that significantly increases the chances of a successful search.
13th June 2017

Biosensor zymonic acid shows changes in pH value

Biosensor zymonic acid shows changes in pH value
Tumors, inflammation and circulatory disorders locally disturb the body's acid-base balance. These changes in pH value could be used for example to verify the success of cancer treatments. Up to now, however, there has been no imaging method to render such changes visible in patients. Now a team from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has developed a pH sensor that renders pH values visible through magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) – in a non-invasive, radiation-free manner.
11th May 2017

DNA and proteins help develop complex hybrid structures

DNA and proteins help develop complex hybrid structures
Florian Praetorius and Prof. Hendrik Dietz of the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have developed a new method that can be used to construct custom hybrid structures using DNA and proteins. The method opens new opportunities for fundamental research in cell biology and for applications in biotechnology and medicine. Desoxyribonucleic acid, better known by its abbreviation DNA, carries our genetic information.
27th March 2017

The genes that influence growth of prostate and breast tumours

The genes that influence growth of prostate and breast tumours
Mutations in tumour suppressor genes mean that they can no longer keep tumours from growing. In developing cancer, often several mutations come into play. Using "jumping genes," scientists from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and the German Cancer Consortium (DKTK) together with teams from Great Britain and Spain have identified a number of genes that can influence the growth of prostate and breast tumours. They published their results in Nature Genetics.
23rd March 2017

X-rays open up possibilities for heart examinations

X-rays open up possibilities for heart examinations
The most prevalent method for obtaining images of clogged coronary vessels is coronary angiography. For some patients, however, the contrast agents used in this process can cause health problems. A team at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has now demonstrated that the required quantity of these substances can be significantly reduced if monoenergetic X-rays from a miniature particle accelerator are used.
27th February 2017

Optical tweezers unveil the secret of muscle power

Optical tweezers unveil the secret of muscle power
Researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have measured the forces acting between the building blocks titin and α-actinin which stabilise the heart muscle. The human body is a never-ending construction site: Proteins are permanently being decomposed and replaced. But this perpetual reconstruction does not inhibit the body’s functionality.
25th January 2017

Partnership could enable personalised therapies in MS

Partnership could enable personalised therapies in MS
A large global new partnership called 'MultipleMS', coordinated by Karolinska Institute in Sweden, has been awarded 15 million euro from the European Commission in the Horizon2020 program to find novel and better treatments for Multiple Sclerosis (MS). In this project, 21 universities and companies from Europe and the USA will unite efforts to tailor the development and application of therapies to the individual MS patient.
6th January 2017

Identifying suitable target antigens by mass spectrometry

Identifying suitable target antigens by mass spectrometry
Cancer therapies harness the immune system to fight tumors. One of the main principles behind these therapies is to find out precisely which molecules on cancer cells trigger an immune response. A team at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and the Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry has for the first time identified suitable protein structures directly from patients` tumor cells. The procedure therefore opens up new possibilities for individualised targeted cancer treatments.
16th December 2016

Binding modes of inhibitors are basis for drugs

Binding modes of inhibitors are basis for drugs
The immunoproteasome dismantles proteins and the resulting fragments are displayed on the surface of cells. This helps the immune system to recognise abnormal cells. However, in chronic inflammations and autoimmune diseases this “information channel” is overactive. Now researchers at the Technical University of Munich have determined the molecular mechanisms of inhibitors that can selectively thwart the human immunoproteasome - important insights for the targeted development of new drugs.
28th November 2016

Cells offer insights into properties of the heart

Cells offer insights into properties of the heart
Cell models from stem cells serve an ever-increasing role in research of cardiac dysfunction. Researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have succeeded in producing cells which offer new insights into properties of the heart. They installed a molecular sensor into the cells which emits light, and not only makes the cells' electrical activity visible, but also makes it possible for the first time to quickly identify cell types.
2nd September 2016

DNA condensation is carried out on a biochip

DNA condensation is carried out on a biochip
Normally, individual molecules of genetic material repel each other. However, when space is limited DNA molecules must be packed together more tightly. This case arises in sperm, cell nuclei and the protein shells of viruses. An international team of physicists has now succeeded in artificially recreating this so-called DNA condensation on a biochip. Recreating important biological processes in cells to better understand them currently is a major topic of research.
10th August 2016

Enabling the visualisation of oxygen in tissue

Enabling the visualisation of oxygen in tissue
Learning how to look inside a body without having to cut it open is still an important part of medical research. One of the great challenges in imaging remains the visualisation of oxygen in tissue. A team led by Prof. Vasilis Ntziachristos, Chair for Biological Imaging at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and Director of the Institute for Biological and Medical Imaging at the Helmholtz Centre in Munich, has developed an approach to this task.
29th July 2016


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