Stanford

Address:
Stanford News Service
425 Santa Teresa St.
Stanford, CA
94305-2245
United States of America

Phone: (650) 723-2558

Web: http://news.stanford.edu


Stanford articles

Displaying 1 - 20 of 39

Brain-machine interfaces treat neurological disease

Brain-machine interfaces treat neurological disease
Since the 19th century at least, humans have wondered what could be accomplished by linking our brains – smart and flexible but prone to disease and disarray – directly to technology in all its cold, hard precision. Writers of the time dreamed up intelligence enhanced by implanted clockwork and a starship controlled by a transplanted brain. While these remain inconceivably far-fetched, the melding of brains and machines for treating disease and improving human health is now a reality.
18th October 2017

Mutation can supercharge tumour-suppressor

Mutation can supercharge tumour-suppressor
Cancer researchers have long hailed p53, a tumour-suppressor protein, for its ability to keep unruly cells from forming tumours. But for such a highly studied protein, p53 has hidden its tactics well. Now, researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine have tapped into what makes p53 tick, delineating a clear pathway that shows how the protein mediates anti-tumor activity in pancreatic cancer.
18th October 2017

Stanford psychologists simplify brain-imaging data

Stanford psychologists simplify brain-imaging data
Neuroscience research has made incredible strides toward revealing the inner workings of our brains thanks in part to technological advances, but barriers in sharing and accessing that data stymie progress in the field. Stanford psychologists are addressing those barriers through a new way of organising brain-imaging data that simplifies data analysis and helps researchers collaborate more effectively – they call it BIDS (Brain Imaging Data Structure).
2nd October 2017


VR helps study origins of fear and anxiety

VR helps study origins of fear and anxiety
Our irrational fears are both very real and are also figments of our imagination. By manipulating what we think of as reality, researchers at Stanford University are working to understand the source of our anxieties and how to alleviate them. In order to do so, they built a virtual reality chamber where one’s fears can be generated by a computer. In 1984, the book, this was done in a special room as well, but with real objects of fear and for opposite reasons.
11th September 2017

Models help doctors manage movement disorders

Models help doctors manage movement disorders
Computer-generated skeletons are competing in a virtual race, running, hopping and jumping as far as they can before collapsing in an electronic heap. Meanwhile, in the real world, their coaches – teams of machine learning and artificial intelligence enthusiasts – are competing to see who can best train their skeletons to mimic those complex human movements. The event’s creator has a serious end goal: making life better for kids with cerebral palsy.
7th August 2017

VR system helps surgeons and reassures patients

VR system helps surgeons and reassures patients
Having undergone two aneurysm surgeries, Sandi Rodoni thought she understood everything about the procedure. But when it came time for her third surgery, the Watsonville, California, resident was treated to a virtual reality trip inside her own brain. Stanford Medicine is using a new software system that combines imaging from MRIs, CT scans and angiograms to create a 3D model that physicians and patients can see and manipulate — just like a virtual reality game.
13th July 2017

Algorithm diagnoses heart arrhythmias with high accuracy

Algorithm diagnoses heart arrhythmias with high accuracy
A new algorithm developed by Stanford computer scientists can sift through hours of heart rhythm data generated by some wearable monitors to find sometimes life-threatening irregular heartbeats, called arrhythmias. The algorithm, detailed in an arXiv paper, performs better than trained cardiologists, and has the added benefit of being able to sort through data from remote locations where people don’t have routine access to cardiologists.
7th July 2017

Radiation-exposed corals may hold insights on cancer

Radiation-exposed corals may hold insights on cancer
More than 70 years after the U.S. tested atomic bombs on a ring of sand in the Pacific Ocean called Bikini Atoll, Stanford researchers are studying how long-term radiation exposure there has affected corals that normally grow for centuries without developing cancer. The researchers’ work is featured in an episode of “Big Pacific,” a five-week PBS series about species, natural phenomena and behaviors of the Pacific Ocean.
28th June 2017

Cellular 'guillotine' helps understand how single cells heal

Cellular 'guillotine' helps understand how single cells heal
While doing research at the Woods Hole Marine Biological Laboratory in Massachusetts, Sindy Tang learned of a remarkable organism: Stentor coeruleus. It’s a single-celled, free-living freshwater organism, shaped like a trumpet and big enough to see with the naked eye. And, to Tang’s amazement, if cut in half it can heal itself into two healthy cells. Tang, who is an assistant professor of mechanical engineering at Stanford University, knew right away that she had to study this incredible ability.
27th June 2017

Photosynthesis could help damaged hearts

Photosynthesis could help damaged hearts
In the ongoing hunt to find better treatments for heart disease, the top cause of death globally, new research from Stanford shows promising results using an unusual strategy: photosynthetic bacteria and light. Researchers found that by injecting a type of bacteria into the hearts of anaesthestised rats with cardiac disease, then using light to trigger photosynthesis, they were able to increase the flow of oxygen and improve heart function, according to a study published in Science Advances.
16th June 2017

Viruses could treat childhood brain tumours

Viruses could treat childhood brain tumours
Scientists have tested a new therapy based on oncolytic viruses for the treatment of paediatric gliomas. Used in combination with chemotherapy, it represents a more effective treatment of this malignancy. Childhood brain tumours known as high-grade gliomas (HGGs) pose a great challenge to paediatric oncology with just 10% survival. The current therapeutic choices are limited and cause severe neurologic and cognitive side-effects.
19th May 2017

Genetic patterns could aid scientists and police

Genetic patterns could aid scientists and police
How much could one really figure out about a person from 13 tiny snippets of DNA? At first glance, not much – in the world of genetics, 13 is tiny. But a new study suggests it may be enough to infer hundreds of thousands more markers, potentially revealing a wealth of genetic information, Stanford biologists report in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
16th May 2017

Experimental tech monitors drug levels in the body

Experimental tech monitors drug levels in the body
As with coffee or alcohol, the way each person processes medication is unique. One person's perfect dose may be another person's deadly overdose. With such variability, it can be hard to prescribe exactly the right amount of critical drugs, such as chemotherapy or insulin. Now, a team led by Stanford electrical engineer H. Tom Soh and postdoctoral fellow Peter Mage has developed a drug delivery tool that could make it easier for people to get the correct dose of lifesaving drugs.
10th May 2017

Assembling working human forebrain circuits in a lab dish

Assembling working human forebrain circuits in a lab dish
Peering into laboratory glassware, Stanford University School of Medicine researchers have watched stem-cell-derived nerve cells arising in a specific region of the human brain migrate into another brain region. This process recapitulates what's been believed to occur in a developing fetus, but has never previously been viewed in real time. The investigators saw the migrating nerve cells, or neurons, hook up with other neurons in the target region to form functioning circuits characteristic of the cerebral cortex.
27th April 2017

Stanford undergrads win Lemelson-MIT Student Prize

Stanford undergrads win Lemelson-MIT Student Prize
  A team of Stanford ChEM-H undergraduates has won the Lemelson-MIT Student Prize for their development of proteins that could combat multidrug-resistant bacteria, which the World Health Organisation has described as one of the most serious public health threats the world faces today.
21st April 2017

Wearable sweat sensor can diagnose cystic fibrosis

Wearable sweat sensor can diagnose cystic fibrosis
A wristband-type wearable sweat sensor could transform diagnostics and drug evaluation for cystic fibrosis, diabetes and other diseases. The sensor collects sweat, measures its molecular constituents and then electronically transmits the results for analysis and diagnostics, according to a study led by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine, in collaboration with the University of California-Berkeley.
20th April 2017

Brain’s navigation more complex than previously thought

Brain’s navigation more complex than previously thought
Just like a driver in a car, the brain needs some basic navigational instruments to get around, and it is not an idle analogy. In fact, scientists have found brain cells that are similar to speedometers, compasses, GPS and even collision warning systems. That simple analogy, however, may belie the more complex way our brains actually map out the world, Stanford researchers report in Neuron.
7th April 2017

Studying Pavlovian conditioning in neural networks

Studying Pavlovian conditioning in neural networks
In the decades following the work by physiologist Ivan Pavlov and his famous salivating dogs, scientists have discovered how molecules and cells in the brain learn to associate stimuli, like Pavlov’s bell and the resulting food. What they haven’t been able to study is how whole groups of neurons work together to form that association. Now, Stanford University researchers have observed how large groups of neurons in the brain both learn and unlearn a new association.
23rd March 2017

Imaging technology creates 3D bladder reconstruction

Imaging technology creates 3D bladder reconstruction
The way doctors examine the bladder for tumors or stones is like exploring the contours of a cave with a flashlight. Using cameras attached to long, flexible instruments called endoscopes, they find that it’s sometimes difficult to orient the location of masses within the bladder’s blood vessel-lined walls. This could change with a new computer vision technique developed by Stanford researchers that creates 3D bladder reconstructions out of the endoscope’s otherwise fleeting images.
17th March 2017

Low-energy artificial synapse aids neural network computing

Low-energy artificial synapse aids neural network computing
For all the improvements in computer technology over the years, we still struggle to recreate the low-energy, elegant processing of the human brain. Now, researchers at Stanford University and Sandia National Laboratories have made an advance that could help computers mimic one piece of the brain’s efficient design – an artificial version of the space over which neurons communicate, called a synapse.
22nd February 2017


Sign up to view our publications

Sign up

Sign up to view our downloads

Sign up

European Smart Homes 2017
25th October 2017
United Kingdom London
TU-Automotive Europe 2017
6th November 2017
Germany Munich
Productronica 2017
14th November 2017
Germany Messe Munchen
Future Armoured Vehicles Survivability 2017
14th November 2017
United Kingdom London
POWER & ENERGY 2017
22nd November 2017
Rwanda Kigali