OSA (The Optical Society)

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Phone: +1.202.416.1435

Web: http://www.osa.org


OSA (The Optical Society) articles

Displaying 1 - 12 of 12

Portable spectrometer supports biological sample imaging anywhere

Portable spectrometer supports biological sample imaging anywhere
Spectral images, which contain more colour information than is obtainable with a typical camera, reveal characteristics of tissue and other biological samples that can’t be seen by the naked eye. A new smartphone-compatible device that is held like a pencil could make it practical to acquire spectral images of everyday objects and may eventually be used for point-of-care medical diagnosis in remote locations.
15th November 2017

Stretchable fibre optic measures changes in body movements

Stretchable fibre optic measures changes in body movements
Engineers at Tsinghua University in Beijing, China have now developed a way to use a special optical fibre to detect minute changes in the movement of various body parts. The advancement will hopefully help patients undergoing musculoskeletal rehabilitation, athletes improve their training techniques, and everyone to play video games in an exciting new way. Though the approach is not entirely new, as fibre optics are already widely used to measure physical strains that buildings and bridges are subjected to.
16th October 2017

Optical tool to spot nerves during surgery

Optical tool to spot nerves during surgery
  During operations, it can be difficult for surgeons to avoid severing crucial nerves because they look so much like other tissue. A new noninvasive approach that uses polarised light to make nerves stand out from other tissue could help surgeons avoid accidentally injuring nerves or assist them in identifying nerves in need of repair.
17th August 2017


Optical clearing technique studies the inside of blood clots

Optical clearing technique studies the inside of blood clots
A new technique that makes blood clots optically clear is allowing researchers to use powerful optical microscopy techniques to study the 3D structure of dangerous clots for the first time. Although blood clots stop bleeding after injury, clots that block blood flow can cause strokes and heart attacks. The new approach could make it possible to use advanced light microscopy techniques such as confocal microscopy to correlate clinical symptoms with the 3D structure of clots from patients.
18th July 2017

Imaging technique to help study neuro diseases

Imaging technique to help study neuro diseases
Researchers have developed a fast and practical molecular-scale imaging technique that could let scientists view never-before-seen dynamics of biological processes involved in neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease and multiple sclerosis. The new technique reveals a sample’s chemical makeup as well as the orientation of molecules making up that sample, information that can be used to understand how molecules are behaving.
18th July 2017

Multi-modality imaging probe helps avoid biopsies

Multi-modality imaging probe helps avoid biopsies
In an important step toward endoscopic diagnosis of cancer, researchers have developed a handheld fibre optic probe that can be used to perform multiple nonlinear imaging techniques without the need for tissue staining. The new multimodal imaging probe uses an ultrafast laser to create nonlinear optical effects in tissue that can reveal cancer and other diseases. A newly developed handheld fibre optic probe can perform multiple microscopy techniques without the need for tissue staining.
8th May 2017

Nanoscale X-ray sensor improves imaging and radiotherapy

Nanoscale X-ray sensor improves imaging and radiotherapy
Using a tiny device known as an optical antenna, researchers have created an X-ray sensor that is integrated onto the end of an optical fibre just a few tens of microns in diameter. By detecting X-rays at an extremely small spatial scale, the sensor could be combined with X-ray delivering technologies to enable high-precision medical imaging and therapeutic applications.
3rd April 2017

LED-based imaging device detects skin damage

LED-based imaging device detects skin damage
To eradicate any cancer cells that may potentially remain after surgery or chemotherapy, many breast cancer patients also undergo radiation therapy. All patients experience unfortunate side effects including skin irritation, and sometimes peeling and blistering. Patients can also develop permanent discoloration of the skin and thickening of the breast tissue months, or even years, after treatment.
3rd April 2017

Low-cost method produces light-based lab-on-a-chip devices

A fabrication process could make it easier and less expensive to incorporate optical sensing onto lab-on-a-chip devices. These devices integrate laboratory functions onto a plastic or glass "chip" typically no more than a few square centimeters in size, allowing automated testing in the doctor's office or various types of chemical or biological analysis with portable instruments.
27th March 2017

Technique offers breakthrough imaging of melanoma

Technique offers breakthrough imaging of melanoma
  Melanoma is the deadliest form of skin cancer, with over 232,000 new cases and 55,000 deaths per year worldwide. Those with light-skin or red hair are often prone to hard-to-detect melanomas, often caused by properties of pigments within skin called melanins.
8th March 2017

Sensor could help fight deadly bacterial infections

Scientists have built a sensor that can detect the potentially deadly E.coli bacteria in 15-20 minutes, much faster than traditional lab tests. E.coli can be transmitted in contaminated food and water, posing particular risks to children and the elderly. In the late spring of 2011 a serious outbreak of E.coli bacteria sickened thousands of people in Germany and killed more than 50.
7th September 2016

Probe improves measurement of brain temperature

Probe improves measurement of brain temperature
  In a paper published in Biomedical Optics Express, from The Optical Society (OSA), Stefan Musolino of the University of Adelaide and the ARC Centre of Excellence for Nanoscale BioPhotonics, Australia, and his colleagues describe an optical fibre-based probe capable of making pinpoint brain temperature measurements in moving lab animals. 
21st July 2016


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