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Lund University articles

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Hospital cleaning can protect patients from resistant bacteria

Hospital cleaning can protect patients from resistant bacteria
  Hospitals should design premises and adapt their infection control routines to a society that no longer has effective antibiotics, and that is vulnerable to fast-spreading global pandemics. This is argued in a new dissertation from Lund University in Sweden.
18th September 2017

Faster test response with popular and flowing technology

Faster test response with popular and flowing technology
It began with the inkjet printers in the 1950s but is now rapidly developing in the medical technology industry. It's about the art of controlling and influencing extremely narrow fluid flow, also known as microfluidics, which will lead to more detailed information about our health. An international conference on the subject in Lund will be held on 5-6 September. When fluids flow in micrometers, they begin to behave differently, which researchers can take advantage of.
4th September 2017

How Alzheimer’s disease affects the brain at different ages

How Alzheimer’s disease affects the brain at different ages
Alzheimer’s disease can lead to several widely divergent symptoms and, so far, its various expressions have mainly been observed through the behaviour and actions of patients. Researchers at Lund University in Sweden have now produced images showing the changes in the brain associated with these symptoms – a development which increases knowledge and could facilitate future diagnostics and treatment.
31st August 2017


Lund University opens research programmes within brain research

Lund University opens research programmes within brain research
  During the Science Week The Amazing Brain from 4 to 10 September (link to programme on lunduniversity.lu.se), Lund University will invite the public on an exciting trip into our mental universe! New ways of studying the brain are continually being developed, thereby also broadening the research field, which currently spans many disciplines.
29th August 2017

An improved analysis of kidney cancer

An improved analysis of kidney cancer
Every year, just over 1000 people are diagnosed with kidney cancer in Sweden. The three most common variants are clear cell, papillary and chromophobe renal cancer. Researchers compare the gene expression in tumour cells from a kidney cancer patient with cells from healthy tissue to figure out in which part of the kidney the cancer began and what went wrong in these cells.
14th August 2017

Production of brain cells enables further research

Production of brain cells enables further research
Important pieces of the puzzle to understand what drives diseases such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s are still missing today. One crucial obstacle for researchers is that it is impossible to examine a living brain cell in someone who is affected by the disease. With the help of a new method for cell conversion, researchers at Lund University in Sweden have found a way to produce diseased, aging brain cells on a large scale in a cell culture dish.
27th June 2017

Silver atom nanoclusters could become efficient biosensors

Silver atom nanoclusters could become efficient biosensors
By combining chemistry and nanotechnology, the research community in recent years has developed a kind of extremely small nanoclusters consisting of only a few noble metal atoms bound to a DNA fragment. Such complexes are of major interest on account of their optical properties. They are considered to have great potential, for example, in the imaging applications and development of biosensors.
14th June 2017

Cholesterol is a key player at the lung surface

Cholesterol is a key player at the lung surface
The zone in the lung where the exchange of oxygen and carbon dioxide takes place between the body and the air we inhale are called the alveoli. Now, in a joint study, researchers in chemistry and medicine at Lund University have more closely examined the thin film of proteins and fats that stabilises and protects the alveoli. This film, known as surfactant, also affects the transport of various molecules between the air and the body’s blood vessels.
1st June 2017

Test method predicts allergenic potency of chemicals

Researchers at Lund University in Sweden have developed a method which determines not only whether a chemical or substance is allergenic, but also how strong its potential for causing hypersensitivity is. This will aid in the establishment of so-called threshold values – or how much of a substance is safe to use in a product. Until now, the only way of achieving similar results has been through animal testing.
30th May 2017

Neurons can learn temporal patterns

Neurons can learn temporal patterns
  Individual neurons can learn not only single responses to a particular signal, but also a series of reactions at precisely timed intervals. This is what emerges from a study at Lund University in Sweden.
30th May 2017

Mobile phone could help reveal radiation exposure

Mobile phone could help reveal radiation exposure
In accidents or terror attacks which are suspected to involve radioactive substances, it can be difficult to determine whether people nearby have been exposed to radiation. But by analysing mobile phones and other objects which come in close contact with the body, it is possible to retrieve important information on radiation exposure. This has been shown by a new thesis from Lund University in Sweden.
25th May 2017

Defence mechanism against bacteria discovered

  Researchers in dermatology at Lund University in Sweden believe they have cracked the mystery of why we are able to quickly prevent an infection from spreading uncontrollably in the body during wounding. They believe this knowledge may be of clinical significance for developing new ways to counteract bacteria.
8th May 2017

Images of early stage Alzheimer’s disease revealed

Images of early stage Alzheimer’s disease revealed
Researchers at Lund University in Sweden have used the MAX IV synchrotron in Lund – the strongest of its kind in the world - to produce images that predate the formation of toxic clumps of beta-amyloid, the protein believed to be at the root of Alzheimer’s disease. The unique images appear to contradict a previously unchallenged consensus. Instead of attempting to eliminate beta-amyloid, or so-called plaques, the researchers now suggest stabilising the protein.
13th March 2017

What cancer research can learn from military strategy

What cancer research can learn from military strategy
When David Gisselsson Nord, a cancer researcher at Lund University in Sweden, read a history book last summer, he was struck by the similarities between how cancer and insurgencies evolve over time. Could military strategy be used as inspiration for cancer treatment? He teamed up with Robert Egnell at the Swedish Defence University to find an entirely novel approach to his field.
9th March 2017

How solvents affect the skin

How solvents affect the skin
Researchers at Lund University in Sweden have developed a method that makes it possible to see how individual molecules from solvents in skin creams, medicated ointments and cleaning products affect and interact with the skin’s own molecules. In the study, the researchers have examined how molecules added to the skin through various liquids and creams affect the skin, and how the same molecules are affected by being inside the skin.
18th January 2017

Visualising cell migration on a molecular level

Visualising cell migration on a molecular level
It’s a known fact that cells can move around the body, but how they do it has been unknown – until now. Researcher in Infection Medicine Pontus Nordenfelt at Lund University in Sweden has managed to describe and visualise cell migration on a molecular level. In time, this could become significant in the treatment of infectious diseases, inflammation, cancer, etc. where cell migration plays an important role.
12th October 2016

Researchers uncover the skin barrier

Researchers uncover the skin barrier
Researchers at the Faculty of Science at Lund University in Sweden can now explain how the properties of the skin change depending on the environment. The new findings explain, among other things, why people don’t dehydrate in dry air. The research results can also be used in the cosmetic and pharmaceutical industry to make substances penetrate the skin more effectively.
28th September 2016

Imaging technique in Alzheimer’s disease

Imaging technique in Alzheimer’s disease
  Tau PET is a promising imaging method for Alzheimer’s disease. A case study from Lund University in Sweden now confirms that tau PET images correspond to a higher degree to actual changes in the brain. According to the researchers behind the study, this increases opportunities for developing effective drugs.
28th September 2016

Barcodes show the blood family tree

Barcodes show the blood family tree
By assigning a barcode to stem cells, researchers at Lund University in Sweden have made it possible to monitor large blood cell populations as well as individual blood cells, and study the changes over time. Among other things, they discovered that stem cells go through different stages where their ability to restore immune cells varies. The findings provide important information for the research and treatment of leukaemia and autoimmune diseases.
25th August 2016

Ultrasound technique increases awareness about cancer cells

Ultrasound technique increases awareness about cancer cells
Researchers at Lund University and the MIT in the US have developed a method to analyse and separate cells from the blood. Ultimately, the method, which goes under the name iso-acoustic focusing, can become significant to measure the efficiency of cancer treatments for individuals. In brief, the method involves exposing cells to ultrasound when they flow through a so-called micro-channel inside a chip.
25th May 2016


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