Georgia Institute of Technology

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Georgia Institute of Technology articles

Displaying 1 - 20 of 26

Microneedle patches successful in first human clinical trial

  Despite the potentially severe consequences of illness and even death, only about 40% of adults in the United States receive flu shots each year; however, researchers believe a new self-administered, painless vaccine skin patch containing microscopic needles could significantly increase the number of people who get vaccinated.
25th August 2017

What causes targeted cancer therapies to deflect their aim?

What causes targeted cancer therapies to deflect their aim?
Broad inadequacies in a widespread biological concept that affects cancer research could be significantly deflecting the aim of such targeted drugs, according to a new study. A team exploring genetic mechanisms in cancer at the Georgia Institute of Technology has found evidence that a prevailing concept about how cells produce protein molecules, particularly when applied to cancer, could be erroneous as much as two-thirds of the time.
16th August 2017

NIAID supports transplant imaging research

NIAID supports transplant imaging research
The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases has awarded Emory and Georgia Tech investigators a $2.4 million, five-year grant to study non-invasive imaging to detect immune rejection of transplanted organs. When transplant recipients see their doctors, they undergo tests to check whether their immune system is damaging their new organs. These are usually blood tests that check for kidney or liver function, at least to begin with. But to diagnose immune rejection, a biopsy is required.
7th August 2017


Nanomaterials for A.I. retina receive $7 million grant

Nanomaterials for A.I. retina receive $7 million grant
A future android brain like that of Star Trek’s Commander Data might contain neuristors, multi-circuit components that emulate the firings of human neurons. Neuristors already exist today in labs, in small quantities, and to fuel the quest to boost neuristors’ power and numbers for practical use in brain-like computing, the U.S. Department of Defense has awarded a $7.1 million grant to a research team led by the Georgia Institute of Technology.
31st July 2017

Breaking cancer’s protrusions could thwart metastasis

Breaking cancer’s protrusions could thwart metastasis
A research team led by the Georgia Institute of Technology has developed a treatment to thwart metastasis by, in a sense, breaking cancer cells’ legs. Cancer cells often cover themselves with bristly leg-like protrusions that enable them to creep. The researchers have used minuscule gold rods heated gently by a laser to mangle the protrusions, according to study.
27th June 2017

How the brain inhibits individual muscle control

How the brain inhibits individual muscle control
The key to balance is, in part, the ability to overpower your mind. Your brain possesses what some researchers call “common drive.” It wants to activate and relax all muscles in synchrony, including the opposing ones. It’s probably why you find yourself swaying while trying to balance on one leg. When you start to teeter, your mind drives all the muscles to stiffen at the same time. The problem: This drive contains muscle oscillations, which cause you to sway again and continue the process.
14th June 2017

Behaviour of human brain influences computing system

Behaviour of human brain influences computing system
A team of researchers at Georgia Institute of Technology and University of Notre Dame has created a computing system that aims to tackle one of computing’s hardest problems in a fraction of the time. “We wanted to find a way to solve a problem without using the normal binary representations that have been the backbone of computing for decades,” said Arijit Raychowdhury, an associate professor in Georgia Tech’s School of Electrical and Computer Engineering.
12th June 2017

Transplant tech could benefit patients with type 1 diabetes

Transplant tech could benefit patients with type 1 diabetes
Combining a new hydrogel material with a protein that boosts blood vessel growth could improve the success rate for transplanting insulin-producing islet cells into persons with type 1 diabetes. In an animal model, the technique enhanced the survival rate of transplanted insulin-producing cells, restoring insulin production in response to blood glucose levels and curing these diabetic animals.
5th June 2017

Another source of electrical instability in the heart found

Another source of electrical instability in the heart found
Sudden cardiac death resulting from fibrillation – erratic heartbeat due to electrical instability – is one of the leading causes of death in the United States. Now, researchers have discovered a fundamentally new source of that electrical instability, a development that could potentially lead to new methods for predicting and preventing life-threatening cardiac fibrillation.
5th May 2017

Research suggests better route to FDA-approved drugs

Research suggests better route to FDA-approved drugs
Alkaloid-based pharmaceuticals derived from plants can be potent treatments for a variety of illnesses. But getting these powerful therapeutic agents from plants can take a long time and cost plenty of money, because it often takes a lot of plants to make a small amount of drug product. Yet advances in metabolic engineering of microbes could lead to cheaper, faster production of drugs already approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA).
28th March 2017

Device teaches how to perform CPR correctly

Device teaches how to perform CPR correctly
The years Ryan Williams spent working as a lifeguard and CPR instructor in Las Vegas taught him that it’s important for people to know how to perform the life-saving procedure. But few people have the time or money to take a class. Williams wanted to find a way to bring the training to more people. He teamed up with two friends, and together the three Georgia Tech students invented a device that walks a person through all the steps to perform CPR.
15th March 2017

Improved tool keeps patients and doctors safe

A medical device used in more than 80% of all procedures is getting a much-needed make-over from four biomedical engineering majors. Doctors, veterinarians and other other medical personnel use electrocautery devices to remove unwanted tissue and to prevent or stop bleeding. The tool heats to 1200 degrees at the touch of a button and because it remains hot after use, the tip can accidently burn patients or the doctors, said Dev Mandavia, a student in Georgia Tech’s Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering.
14th March 2017

A promise for patients with damaged corneas

A promise for patients with damaged corneas
Researchers working as part of the University of Georgia’s Regenerative Bioscience Center have developed a new way to identify and sort stem cells that may one day allow clinicians to restore vision to people with damaged corneas using the patient’s own eye tissue. They published their findings in Biophysical Journal. The cornea is a transparent layer of tissue covering the front of the eye, and its health is maintained by a group of cells called limbal stem cells.
14th March 2017

App enables photo uploads into medical records

App enables photo uploads into medical records
When Richard Bruce and Gary Wendt, both professedly “geeks at heart,” assessed the medical imaging landscape in the early 2000s, they were astonished to find that nearly all medical images were being transferred between hospitals on compact discs rather than through the internet. That was old-school, and not in a good way, says Bruce, who had previously worked at the network giant Cisco Systems.
9th March 2017

DNA “barcoding” aids therapeutic delivery

DNA “barcoding” aids therapeutic delivery
Using tiny snippets of DNA as “barcodes,” researchers have developed a new technique for rapidly screening the ability of nanoparticles to selectively deliver therapeutic genes to specific organs of the body. The technique could accelerate the development and use of gene therapies for such killers as heart disease, cancer and Parkinson’s disease. Genetic therapies, such as those made from DNA or RNA, are hard to deliver into the right cells in the body.
9th February 2017

Microgel composite could accelerate healing

Microgel composite could accelerate healing
In regenerative medicine, the ideal repair material would offer properties that seem impossibly contradictory. It must be rigid and robust enough to be manipulated surgically, yet soft and porous enough to allow healing cells to pass through it to launch repair and regeneration processes. Now, researchers have taken an important step toward creating such a material by combining water-filled particles known as microgels with robust polymer networks made of natural fibrin.
27th January 2017

The health informatics revolution

The health informatics revolution
Using massive data sets, machine learning, and high-performance computing, health analytics and informatics is drawing us closer to the holy grail of health care: precision medicine, which promises diagnosis and treatment tailored to individual patients. The information, including findings from the latest peer-reviewed studies, will arrive on the desktops and mobile devices of clinicians in health care facilities large and small through a new generation of decision-support systems.
12th December 2016

Bringing life-saving cell therapies to the masses

Bringing life-saving cell therapies to the masses
Doctors knew long before Owen Webb was born that they were racing against the clock to save his life. Tests had confirmed the developing child suffered from Krabbe disease, a genetic disorder that causes toxins to build up in the nervous system, progressively damaging the brain. Just days after he was delivered, a medical team at Duke University began Owen on nine days of chemotherapy. His body was then infused with stem cell-rich donor umbilical cord blood.
12th December 2016

Secret phenotypes: disease devils in invisible details

Secret phenotypes: disease devils in invisible details
When a microscopic lab worm grows an eye-popping oddity, scientists locate the mutated gene that caused it. It’s truly interesting. Yet, more important findings, medically relevant ones, may be hiding in traits invisible to the eye, even with the best microscope. Researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology are exposing these secrets - micron-sized bumps and grooves - and the intricate web of gene mutations possibly behind them in high detail. Their work could prove useful to understanding debilitating disorders.
24th November 2016

Ovarian cancer growth inhibited by nanoparticle delivery

Ovarian cancer growth inhibited by nanoparticle delivery
In the fight against cancer, doctors dish out combination-blows of surgery, chemotherapy and other drugs to beat back a merciless foe. Now, scientists have taken early steps toward adding a stinging punch to clinicians' repertoire. A novel targeted therapy using nanoparticles has enabled researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology to purge ovarian tumors in limited, in vivo tests in mice.
7th November 2016


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