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ETH Zurich articles

Displaying 1 - 14 of 14

Battling dehydration with wearables and big data

Battling dehydration with wearables and big data
  Dehydration is one of the most common causes of death among young children in the developing world – particularly during the hot summer months. ETH Professor Walter Karlen and his team of researchers have developed an inexpensive mobile device that could be used by laypeople to more effectively treat dehydration.
3rd August 2017

Silicone heart beats almost like a human heart

Silicone heart beats almost like a human heart
  ETH researchers from the Functional Materials Laboratory have developed a silicone heart that beats almost like a human heart. In collaboration with colleagues from the Product Development Group Zurich, they have tested how well it works.
13th July 2017

Robot gives injections for elderly with retinal disease

Robot gives injections for elderly with retinal disease
  Patients with age-related retinal disease need regular injections in the eye. At the moment, these must be given by specially trained medical doctors, but a robot may well handle this task in the near future.
22nd June 2017


The search for relevance in a field swamped by data

The search for relevance in a field swamped by data
  Genomics, digital patient files and real-time health surveillance – never before have we had access to so much health data. ETH researchers explain how they extract relevant information from this sea of data and the potential benefits for personalised medicine.
16th June 2017

Killer cells use dormant viruses to track down tumours

Killer cells use dormant viruses to track down tumours
The use of immunotherapy to treat cancer is celebrating its first successes – but there are still many knowledge gaps in the underlying mechanisms of action. In a study of mice with soft tissue tumours, ETH researchers have now shown how endogenous killer cells track down the tumours with the help of dormant viruses. The promising drug is known as F8-TNF. When injected into the bloodstream, it lures killer cells from the body’s immune system towards sarcomas. The killer cells then destroy the tumours.
5th June 2017

Research project focuses on microbial communities

Research project focuses on microbial communities
Led by ETH Zurich and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), three ETH research groups are collaborating with several US universities to investigate microbial ecosystems, with a special focus on the oceans. The research project, named Theory of Microbial Ecosystems (THE-ME), is supported by the Simons Foundation, which will provide 15 million US dollars over a period of at least five years.
31st May 2017

Analysing a molecular toxin transporter

Analysing a molecular toxin transporter
Almost all living creatures have evolved mechanisms to remove toxins that have entered their cells: molecular pumps located in the cell membrane recognise harmful substances in the cell interior and transport them outside. Researchers from ETH Zurich and the Biozentrum of the University of Basel have now defined the three-dimensional structure of such a transport protein in humans (the protein ABCG2) at the atomic level. This is the first time such a structure has been defined for a human multi-drug transporter.
30th May 2017

Platforms implement electrophysiological cell analysis

Platforms implement electrophysiological cell analysis
MaxWell Biosystems AG’s head office is hidden away in a Basel laboratory building previously used by Syngenta, just a stone’s throw from ETH Zurich’s Department of Biosystems Science and Engineering (D-BSSE). Most rooms are still empty, but on the third floor, in a spacious laboratory at the end of a long corridor, the entrepreneurial atmosphere is already palpable.
24th May 2017

A novel form of iron for fortification of foods

A novel form of iron for fortification of foods
Around 1.2 billion people worldwide suffer from iron deficiency, with women worse affected than men. In Europe, one in five women around the age of 20 suffers from iron deficiency. Symptoms include diminished work performance, fatigue, anaemia and headaches. Boosting iron levels through the diet or supplements is tricky, as the iron must be in a form that the body is able to absorb successfully. Iron is also a trace element that can alter the colour, taste and smell of the food it is added to, making it far less appetising.
26th April 2017

Area of the brain affected by autism detected

Area of the brain affected by autism detected
  Brain researchers at ETH Zurich and other universities have shown for the first time that a region of the brain associated with empathy only activates very weakly in autistic people. This knowledge could help to develop new therapies for those affected by autism.
3rd April 2017

Allowing non-invasive reconstruction of teeth

Allowing non-invasive reconstruction of teeth
In recent years, IT experts have developed sophisticated image-based digital reconstruction methods for modelling the human face. These methods capture highly detailed images of the face or specific areas of the face – such as hair, eyes or eyelids – and create a digital model of them. In the past, however, very little attention has been given to the mouth cavity in general, and the teeth in particular.
17th February 2017

The latest weapon against Diabetes

The latest weapon against Diabetes
Researchers led by ETH Professor Martin Fussenegger at the Department of Biosystems Science and Engineering (D-BSSE) in Basel have produced artificial beta cells using a straightforward engineering approach. These pancreatic cells can do everything that natural ones do: they measure the glucose concentration in the blood and produce enough insulin to effectively lower the blood sugar level. The ETH researchers presented their development in the latest edition of the journal Science.
9th December 2016

Microrobots enable non-invasive and selective therapies

Microrobots enable non-invasive and selective therapies
Richard Fleischner, who directed the 1966 cult film Fantastic Voyage, would have been delighted with Bradley Nelson’s research: similar to the story in Fleischner’s film, Nelson wants to load tiny robots with drugs and manoeuvre them to the precise location in the human body where treatment is needed, for instance to the site of a cancer tumour. Alternatively, the tiny creatures could also be fitted with instruments, allowing operations to be performed without surgical intervention.
19th September 2016

Method could revolutionise single cell analysis

Method could revolutionise single cell analysis
ETH researchers have developed a method using a nanosyringe whose tiny needle is able to penetrate single living cells and extract their content. The technology can be used for cell cultures, for example, in order to investigate the interior of the cells. This allows scientists to identify the differences between individual cells at the molecular level, as well as to identify and analyse rare cell types.
15th July 2016


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