EPFL (École polytechnique fédérale de Lausanne)

Address:
CE 3 316 (Centre Est),
Station 1,
Lausanne
CH-1015
Switzerland

Phone: +41 21 693 11 11

Web: http://www.epfl.ch/


EPFL (École polytechnique fédérale de Lausanne) articles

Displaying 1 - 8 of 8

Helping the visually impaired to better understand their surroundings

Helping the visually impaired to better understand their surroundings
At École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL) in Switzerland, engineers have developed a novel touchpad that can represent various objects, idea, and locations to help visually impaired people to learn, navigate, and interact with the world. As part of the BlindPAD project, the device has a bunch of knobs that can pop up or down. The entire array of these popups can create representations of street intersections, objects, and the ups and downs of the terrain, for example.
18th May 2017

A big appetite for progress in edible robotics

A big appetite for progress in edible robotics
Swiss engineers have been working on an edible robot. Their work has served up a number of tech watchers commenting on the wonders of it all: The next robot, suggested writers, could be an edible item crawling through your gut. Machine actuators are the key elements in this undertaking by a team from the Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL). The research was led by graduate student Jun Shintake, said Recode.
14th March 2017

Tool mimics cells' ability to stretch and compress

Tool mimics cells' ability to stretch and compress
A tool developed at EPFL can stretch and compress cells, mimicking what happens in the body. The aim: to study the role played by these mechanical forces in cases of cancer or lymphatic diseases. Complex mechanical forces are constantly at work in the human body, deforming our cells. In our blood vessel walls, for example, cells are stretched approximately once per second by the pulsing blood flow.
5th September 2016


Self-consciousness with every heartbeat

Self-consciousness with every heartbeat
Bodily self-consciousness is an integral part of our everyday life. It allows us to be instinctively aware of where we are and how we move. While this seems trivial, it requires a lot of computation and processing from our brain. But how does the brain produce and regulate it? Using a virtual reality experiment, EPFL scientists have now shown that bodily self-consciousness involves the brain monitoring heartbeat.
26th August 2016

Remote-controlled microrobots aid medical operations

Remote-controlled microrobots aid medical operations
EPFL scientist Selman Sakar teamed up with Hen-Wei Huang and Bradley Nelson at ETHZ to develop a simple and versatile method for building bio-inspired robots and equipping them with advanced features. They also created a platform for testing several robot designs and studying different modes of locomotion. Their work, published in Nature Communications, produced complex reconfigurable microrobots that can be manufactured with high throughput.
22nd July 2016

High-resolution imaging reveals bacterial toxins

Many bacteria use specialised toxins to attack and infect other cells. Scientists at EPFL and the University of Bern have now modeled a major such toxin with unprecedented resolution, uncovering the way it works step-by-step. In order to infect other cells, many bacteria secrete a type of toxin that punctures the membrane of the target cell and form a pore; as a result, the cell dies.
13th July 2016

Amputee feels texture with a bionic fingertip

Amputee feels texture with a bionic fingertip
An amputee was able to feel smoothness and roughness in real-time with an artificial fingertip that was surgically connected to nerves in his upper arm. Moreover, the nerves of non-amputees can also be stimulated to feel roughness, without the need of surgery, meaning that prosthetic touch for amputees can now be developed and safely tested on intact individuals.
8th March 2016

A portable device for rapid and highly sensitive diagnostics

A portable device for rapid and highly sensitive diagnostics
When remote regions with limited health facilities experience an epidemic, they need portable diagnostic equipment that functions outside the hospital. As demand for such equipment grows, EPFL researchers have developed a low-cost and portable microfluidic diagnostic device. It has been tested on Ebola and can be used to detect many other diseases. Over the past several years, microfluidic devices have shown extraordinary potential in the area of diagnostics.
22nd February 2016


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26th June 2017
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