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Columbia University articles

Displaying 1 - 9 of 9

Microneedle patch dissolves 'love handles' in mice

Microneedle patch dissolves 'love handles' in mice
Researchers have devised a medicated skin patch that can turn energy-storing white fat into energy-burning brown fat locally while raising the body’s overall metabolism. The patch could be used to burn off pockets of unwanted fat such as “love handles” and treat metabolic disorders, such as obesity and diabetes, according to researchers at Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC) and the University of North Carolina.
20th September 2017

Robotic training improves walking in children with CP

Robotic training improves walking in children with CP
A team led by Sunil Agrawal, professor of mechanical engineering and of rehabilitation and regenerative medicine at Columbia Engineering, has published a pilot study in Science Robotics that demonstrates a robotic training method that improves posture and walking in children with crouch gait by enhancing their muscle strength and coordination.
27th July 2017

Million electrode array could support brain interfaces

Million electrode array could support brain interfaces
Researchers at Columbia University are working on substantially improving the abilities of brain-computer interfaces by creating a high density electrode array that can stimulate and read the brain at high precision. The research is part of DARPA’s Neural Engineering System Design (NESD) project that is working on all the different pieces necessary to build a truly advanced brain-computer systems.
13th July 2017


Yeast-based tool provides worldwide pathogen detection

Yeast-based tool provides worldwide pathogen detection
Columbia University researchers have developed a tool that is likely to revolutionise the way we detect and treat pathogens in everything from human health to agriculture to water. Using only common household baker’s yeast, they’ve created an extremely low-cost, low-maintenance, on-site dipstick test they hope will aid in the surveillance and early detection of fungal pathogens responsible for major human disease, agricultural damage and food spoilage worldwide.
7th July 2017

Select memories could be 'erased', leaving others intact

Select memories could be 'erased', leaving others intact
Different types of memories stored in the same neuron of the marine snail Aplysia can be selectively erased, according to a new study by researchers at Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC) and McGill University and published in Current Biology. The findings suggest that it may be possible to develop drugs to delete memories that trigger anxiety and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) without affecting other important memories of past events.
23rd June 2017

Growing living bone for facial reconstruction

Growing living bone for facial reconstruction
Researchers have engineered living bone tissue to repair bone loss in the jaw, a structure that is typically difficult to restore. The team led by researchers from Columbia University, New York, grafted customised implants into pig jaws that resulted in integration and function of the engineered graft into the recipient's own tissue. The work, reported in Science Translational Medicine, suggests that personalised bone grafts for facial reconstruction may be possible in the future.
5th August 2016

Lab-grown living bone replicates original structure

Lab-grown living bone replicates original structure
  A technique developed by Gordana Vunjak-Novakovic, the Mikati Foundation Professor of Biomedical Engineering at Columbia Engineering and professor of medical sciences (in Medicine) at Columbia University, repairs large bone defects in the head and face by using lab-grown living bone, tailored to the patient and the defect being treated.
16th June 2016

Gene-editing technology can repair blindness

Gene-editing technology can repair blindness
Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC) and University of Iowa scientists have used a new gene-editing technology called CRISPR to repair a genetic mutation responsible for retinitis pigmentosa (RP), an inherited condition that causes the retina to degrade and leads to blindness in at least 1.5m cases worldwide.
29th January 2016

Using electrical signals to train the heart's muscle cells

Using electrical signals to train the heart's muscle cells
Columbia Engineering researchers have shown, for the first time, that electrical stimulation of human heart muscle cells (cardiomyocytes) engineered from human stem cells aids their development and function. The team used electrical signals, designed to mimic those in a developing heart, to regulate and synchronise the beating properties of nascent cardiomyocytes, the cells that support the beating function of the heart.
20th January 2016


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