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American Chemical Society articles

Displaying 1 - 15 of 15

A chemical and biological threat detector-on-a-ring

A chemical and biological threat detector-on-a-ring
Wearable sensors are revolutionising the tech-world, capable of tracking processes in the body, such as heart rates. They're even becoming fashionable, with many of them sporting sleek, stylish designs. But wearable sensors also can have applications in detecting threats that are external to the body. Researchers now report in ACS Sensors a first-of-its kind device that can do just that. And to stay fashionable, they've designed it as a ring.
12th October 2017

Mussel-inspired glue could make fetal surgery safer

Mussel-inspired glue could make fetal surgery safer
Whether to perform surgery on a fetus is a heart-wrenching decision. This type of surgery involves penetrating the highly delicate amniotic sac, increasing health risks to the fetus. Now researchers report the development of a glue, inspired by the tenacious grip of mussels on slippery rocks, that could one day help save the lives of the youngest patients. The researchers are presenting their findings at the 254th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS).
24th August 2017

Polymer could help lower blood glucose and weight

Polymer could help lower blood glucose and weight
Diabetes is a tough disease to manage. Oral medications, insulin shots, close monitoring of blood sugar, dietary changes and exercise can all factor into a person's treatment regimen. Now researchers are exploring a novel, simpler approach: implanting a polymer sponge into fat tissue. Their study has shown that in obese mice with symptoms resembling Type 2 diabetes, the implant reduced weight gain and blood-sugar levels—by getting the fat to 'talk' again.
22nd August 2017


Barometric sensor detects presence of disease biomarkers

Barometric sensor detects presence of disease biomarkers
Researchers from Jinan University in Guangzhou, China and Washington State University have developed a novel type of sensor that works by measuring pressure changes induced by the production of oxygen (O2). The technology may miniaturise and make readily available testing of a wide variety of biomarkers. The team of researchers has already demonstrated how the technology can be used to detect thrombin, a blood clotting enzyme, and carcinoembryonic antigen, a protein related to a number of cancers.
27th June 2017

Contact lens could measure blood glucose in the future

Contact lens could measure blood glucose in the future
Transparent biosensors embedded into contact lenses could soon allow doctors and patients to monitor blood glucose levels and a host of other telltale signs of disease without invasive tests. Scientists say the bio-sensing lenses, based on technology that led to the development of smartphones with more vivid displays, also could potentially be used to track drug use or serve as an early detection system for cancer and other serious medical conditions.
6th April 2017

A bright 'glow stick' marker for cells

A bright 'glow stick' marker for cells
Any child who has played with a glowstick or captured a firefly understands the wonder of chemiluminescence, or chemical light. This process is already used to detect blood at crime scenes and to determine the concentrations of different components of biological samples. In ACS Central Science, researchers introduced a chemiluminescent probe that is better for use in water and up to 3,000 times brighter than previous probes.
8th March 2017

Tattoos mark the spot for surgery and then disappear

Tattoos mark the spot for surgery and then disappear
Tattoos aren't just for body art. They can have medical applications, too. Doctors are using them on patients to mark an area for future treatment - particularly for non-melanoma skin cancer such as basal cell carcinoma - but the inks can cause problems. Now scientists have developed a better solution. In the journal ACS Nano, they report an ink that glows only under certain light conditions and can disappear altogether after a period of time.
22nd December 2016

Insulin pill could ease pain in diabetes treatment

Every day, millions of Americans with diabetes have to inject themselves with insulin to manage their blood-sugar levels. But less painful alternatives are emerging. Scientists are developing a way of administering the medicine orally with tiny vesicles that can deliver insulin where it needs to go without a shot. They will share their in vivo testing results. The researchers are presenting their work at the 252nd National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS).
24th August 2016

Edible batteries could power ingestible medical devices

Edible batteries could power ingestible medical devices
Non-toxic, edible batteries could one day power ingestible devices for diagnosing and treating disease. One team reports progress toward that goal with their batteries made with melanin pigments, naturally found in the skin, hair and eyes. The researchers will present their work at the 252nd National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS).
23rd August 2016

Injectable gels could prevent future heart failure

Injectable gels could prevent future heart failure
During a heart attack, clots or narrowed arteries block blood flow, harming or killing cells within the tissue. But the damage doesn't end after the crushing pain subsides. Instead, the heart's walls thin out, the organ becomes enlarged, and scar tissue forms. If nothing is done, the patient can eventually experience heart failure. But scientists now report they have developed gels that, in animal tests, can be injected into the heart to shore up weakened areas and prevent heart failure.
22nd August 2016

Simple test improves diagnosis of TB in developing nations

Simple test improves diagnosis of TB in developing nations
In developing nations, the current test to diagnose TB is error-prone, complicated and time-consuming. Furthermore, patients in these resource-limited areas can't easily travel back to a clinic at a later date to get their results. To make diagnoses simpler, faster and more accurate, chemists have developed a quick and easy diagnostic tool. Field trials of the experimental test began in June in South Africa, which has a high incidence of TB.
22nd August 2016

Nanoparticles can speed blood clotting

Nanoparticles can speed blood clotting
Whether severe trauma occurs on the battlefield or the highway, saving lives often comes down to stopping the bleeding as quickly as possible. Many methods for controlling external bleeding exist, but at this point, only surgery can halt blood loss inside the body from injury to internal organs. Now, researchers have developed nanoparticles that congregate wherever injury occurs in the body to help it form blood clots, and they've validated these particles in test tubes and in vivo.
22nd August 2016

Paper-based device spots falsified or degraded medications

Paper-based device spots falsified or degraded medications
The developing world is awash in substandard, degraded or falsified medications, which can either directly harm users or deprive them of needed treatment. And with internet sales of medications on the rise, people everywhere are increasingly at risk. So, a team of researchers has developed a simple, inexpensive paper-based device to screen suspicious medications. The researchers will present their work at the 252nd National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS).
22nd August 2016

Compounds could prevent scars from forming

Compounds could prevent scars from forming
Most people start racking up scars from an early age with scraped knees and elbows. While many of these fade over time, more severe types such as keloids and scars from burns are largely untreatable. These types of scars are associated with permanent functional loss and, in severe cases, carry the stigma of disfigurement. Now scientists are developing new compounds that could stop scars from forming in the first place.
22nd August 2016

Spermbots could help solve male infertility

Spermbots could help solve male infertility
Sperm that don’t swim well rank high among the main causes of infertility. To give these cells a boost, women trying to conceive can turn to artificial insemination or other assisted reproduction techniques, but success can be elusive. In an attempt to improve these odds, scientists have developed motorised 'spermbots' that can deliver poor swimmers — that are otherwise healthy — to an egg. Their report appears in ACS’ journal Nano Letters.
15th January 2016


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