Bioengineering

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3D bioprinting: from science fiction to reality?

3D bioprinting: from science fiction to reality?
After over 15 years of research and development in academia and industry, several main applications of 3D bioprinting technology are ready to be realised. In IDTechEx’s new report titled 3D Bioprinting 2017 – 2027: Technologies, Markets, Forecasts, the global 3D bioprinting market is predicted to experience a period of high growth to reach a size of $1.8 billion by the year 2027.
12th May 2017

Engineered bone marrow could improve transplants

Engineered bone marrow could improve transplants
Engineers at the University of California San Diego have developed biomimetic bone tissues that could one day provide new bone marrow for patients needing transplants. Bone marrow transplants are used to treat patients with bone marrow disease. Before a transplant, a patient is first given doses of radiation, sometimes in combination with drugs, to kill off any existing stem cells in the patient's bone marrow.
9th May 2017

Future generation of bionic limbs ‘sees and grabs’

Future generation of bionic limbs ‘sees and grabs’
With over 5,000 amputations carried out in the UK every year, prosthetic and bionic limbs are becoming increasingly popular; therefore it is important that the technology behind them keeps advancing. The latest designed bionic hand works by ‘seeing’ objects, so now it can now immediately decide what type of grip to use when picking up items.
5th May 2017


Wireless power could enable ingestible electronics

Wireless power could enable ingestible electronics
Researchers at MIT, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, and the Charles Stark Draper Laboratory have devised a way to wirelessly power small electronic devices that can linger in the digestive tract indefinitely after being swallowed. Such devices could be used to sense conditions in the gastrointestinal tract, or carry small reservoirs of drugs to be delivered over an extended period.
27th April 2017

3D model of endometrium is developed in a dish

3D model of endometrium is developed in a dish
Scientists at KU Leuven have managed to grow three-dimensional models of the endometrium in a dish. These so-called endometrial organoids can help shed light on the underlying mechanisms of the menstrual cycle. They also make it possible to study endometrial cancer and other diseases of the uterus in a lab dish. During a woman’s menstrual cycle, the endometrium that lines the uterus thickens, matures, and – unless the woman becomes pregnant – degenerates.
27th April 2017

Transparent bones enable observation of inner stem cells

Transparent bones enable observation of inner stem cells
Ten years ago, the bones currently in your body did not actually exist. Like skin, bone is constantly renewing itself, shedding old tissue and growing it anew from stem cells in the bone marrow. Now, a technique developed at Caltech can render intact bones transparent, allowing researchers to observe these stem cells within their environment. The method is a breakthrough for testing new drugs to combat diseases like osteoporosis.
27th April 2017

Artificial womb could reduce mortality for premature babies

Artificial womb could reduce mortality for premature babies
  A unique womb-like environment designed by paediatric researchers could transform care for extremely premature babies, by mimicking the prenatal fluid-filled environment to give the tiniest newborns a precious few weeks to develop their lungs and other organs.
26th April 2017

Graphene changes stem cells for nerve regrowth

Graphene changes stem cells for nerve regrowth
Researchers looking for ways to regenerate nerves can have a hard time obtaining key tools of their trade. Schwann cells are an example. They form sheaths around axons, the tail-like parts of nerve cells that carry electrical impulses. They promote regeneration of those axons. And they secrete substances that promote the health of nerve cells. In other words, they’re very useful to researchers hoping to regenerate nerve cells, specifically peripheral nerve cells, those cells outside the brain and spinal cord.
26th April 2017

3D-printed patch helps mend a broken heart

3D-printed patch helps mend a broken heart
A team of biomedical engineering researchers, led by the University of Minnesota, has created a revolutionary 3D-bioprinted patch that can help heal scarred heart tissue after a heart attack. The discovery is a major step forward in treating patients with tissue damage after a heart attack. The research study is published in Circulation Research, a journal published by the American Heart Association. Researchers have filed a patent on the discovery.
25th April 2017

3D printed cartilage mimics features of knee’s meniscus

3D printed cartilage mimics features of knee’s meniscus
Worn out cartilage in the knees is a major cause of disability and once it’s worn out there’s nothing ideally suited to replace it. Osteoarthritis develops,and eventually much of the entire knee is often replaced, with variable success. Researchers at Duke University have been working on creating a material that can serve as a cartilage replacement and they have already developed something at least as strong and pliable as the cartilage making up the knee’s meniscus.
24th April 2017


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