Bioengineering

Displaying 81 - 90 of 109

Software could accurately predict structure of a drug

A Purdue-based startup is developing molecular modelling simulation software that could help pharmaceutical companies more accurately predict the crystal structure of a drug once produced, helping maintain a consistent drug quality and save costs when developing new drugs. Lyudmila Slipchenko, associate professor in Purdue's Department of Chemistry, and Pradeep Kumar Gurunathan, a graduate student in chemistry, co-founded the company Simplexity Simulations LLC to commercialise the software.
18th August 2016

Enzyme-mapping helps target neglected diseases

Enzyme-mapping helps target neglected diseases
Scientists at MIT and the University of São Paulo in Brazil have identified the structure of an enzyme that could be a good target for drugs combating three diseases common in the developing world. The enzyme, fumarate hydratase (FH) is essential for metabolic processes of parasites that are responsible for the spread of three diseases: Leishmaniases, Chagas disease, and sleeping sickness.
16th August 2016

Triggering blood clotting at the molecular scale

Triggering blood clotting at the molecular scale
Using a unique single-molecule force measurement tool, a research team has developed a clearer understanding of how platelets sense the mechanical forces they encounter during bleeding to initiate the cascading process that leads to blood clotting. Beyond providing a better understanding of this vital bodily process, research into a mechanoreceptor molecule that triggers clotting could provide a potential new target for therapeutic intervention.
16th August 2016


Growing living bone for facial reconstruction

Growing living bone for facial reconstruction
Researchers have engineered living bone tissue to repair bone loss in the jaw, a structure that is typically difficult to restore. The team led by researchers from Columbia University, New York, grafted customised implants into pig jaws that resulted in integration and function of the engineered graft into the recipient's own tissue. The work, reported in Science Translational Medicine, suggests that personalised bone grafts for facial reconstruction may be possible in the future.
5th August 2016

GSK and Verily to develop bioelectronic medicines

  GSK announced an agreement with Verily Life Sciences LLC (formerly Google Life Sciences), an Alphabet company, to form Galvani Bioelectronics to enable the research, development and commercialisation of bioelectronic medicines. GSK will hold a 55% equity interest in the new jointly owned company and Verily will hold 45%.
1st August 2016

Singapore scientists grow mini human brains

Singapore scientists grow mini human brains
Scientists in Singapore have made a big leap on research on the 'mini-brain'. These advanced mini versions of the human midbrain will help researchers develop treatments and conduct other studies into Parkinson's Disease[1] (PD) and ageing-related brain diseases. These mini midbrain versions are 3D miniature tissues that are grown in the laboratory and they have certain properties of specific parts of the human brain. 
1st August 2016

Creating specialised cells more efficiently

Creating specialised cells more efficiently
Researchers at the UCLA Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research have discovered that a metabolic molecule called alpha-ketoglutarate helps pluripotent stem cells mature early in the process of becoming adult organs and tissues. The findings, published online in the journal Cell Metabolism, could be valuable for scientists working toward stem cell–based therapies for a wide range of diseases.
29th July 2016

'Repair system' in algae yields tools for biotechnology

'Repair system' in algae yields tools for biotechnology
A way of fixing inactive proteins has been discovered in an algae, which uses chloroplast extracts and light to release an interrupting sequence from a protein. Research specialist Stephen Campbell and Professor David Stern at the Boyce Thompson Institute report the discovery in the Journal of Biological Chemistry. This repair system may have applications in agriculture and biotechnology because it could potentially be harnessed to enable proteins to become active only in the light.
29th July 2016

Scientists program cells to respond to stimuli

Scientists program cells to respond to stimuli
Synthetic biology allows researchers to program cells to perform novel functions such as fluorescing in response to a particular chemical or producing drugs in response to disease markers. In a step toward devising much more complex cellular circuits, MIT engineers have now programmed cells to remember and respond to a series of events. These cells can remember, in the correct order, up to three different inputs, but this approach should be scalable to incorporate many more stimuli.
22nd July 2016

Surface tension can sort droplets for biomedical applications

Surface tension can sort droplets for biomedical applications
Imagine being able to instantly diagnose diabetes, Ebola or some other disease, simply by watching how a droplet of blood moves on a surface. That's just one potential impact of research led by Arun Kota, assistant professor in Colorado State University's Department of Mechanical Engineering and the School of Biomedical Engineering. Kota's lab makes coatings that repel not just water, but virtually any liquid, including oils and acids - a property called superomniphobicity.
20th July 2016


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