Bioengineering

Displaying 81 - 90 of 138

Magnetic implant offers alternative drug delivery method

Magnetic implant offers alternative drug delivery method
University of British Columbia researchers have developed a magnetic drug implant—the first of its kind in Canada—that could offer an alternative for patients struggling with numerous pills or intravenous injections. The device, a silicone sponge with magnetic carbonyl iron particles wrapped in a round polymer layer, measures just six millimetres in diameter. The drug is injected into the device and then surgically implanted in the area being treated.
14th February 2017

Textile inspires micromanipulation advance biomedicine

Textile inspires micromanipulation advance biomedicine
The EU funded POLYACT project applied textile fabrication principles to the production of microactuators, offering a range of biomedical applications both inside and outside the body. There are a range of advances in biotechnology which take advantage of the ability to manipulate biology at the microscopic level. Yet those fields which rely on optimum dexterity and materials compliance face significant hurdles in realising their full potential.
7th February 2017

Scientists find key cues to regulate bone-building cells

Scientists find key cues to regulate bone-building cells
The prospect of regenerating bone lost to cancer or trauma is a step closer to the clinic as University of Wisconsin–Madison scientists have identified two proteins found in bone marrow as key regulators of the master cells responsible for making new bone. In a study published online in the journal Stem Cell Reports, a team of UW–Madison scientists reports that the proteins govern the activity of mesenchymal stem cells — precursor cells found in marrow that make bone and cartilage.
3rd February 2017


Artificial skin can sense temperature changes

Artificial skin can sense temperature changes
A team of engineers and scientists at Caltech and ETH Zurich have developed an artificial skin capable of detecting temperature changes using a mechanism similar to the one used by the organ that allows pit vipers to sense their prey. The material could be grafted onto prosthetic limbs to restore temperature sensing in amputees. It could also be applied to first-aid bandages to alert health professionals of a temperature increase—a sign of infection—in wounds.
30th January 2017

Nanowired scaffolds engineer heart tissue

Nanowired scaffolds engineer heart tissue
Ischaemic heart disease (IHD) and in particular myocardial infarct (MI) causes over 741 000 deaths every year in the European Union. EU researchers have engineered nanowired scaffolds to regenerate defective heart tissue and restore function. End stage heart failure is currently treated using ventricular assist devices and/or heart transplantation. However, donor organ availability is limited. In this scenario, cardiac tissue engineering shows great promise.
24th January 2017

3D bioprinter can print totally functional human skin

3D bioprinter can print totally functional human skin
Scientists from the Universidad Carlos III de Madrid (UC3M), CIEMAT (Center for Energy, Environmental and Technological Research), Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Marañón, in collaboration with the firm BioDan Group, have presented a prototype for a 3D bioprinter that can create totally functional human skin. This skin is adequate for transplanting to patients or for use in research or the testing of cosmetic, chemical, and pharmaceutical products.
24th January 2017

Blood-repellent materials improve medical implants

Blood-repellent materials improve medical implants
Medical implants like stents, catheters and tubing introduce risk for blood clotting and infection - a perpetual problem for many patients. Colorado State University engineers offer a potential solution: A specially grown, "superhemophobic" titanium surface that's extremely repellent to blood. The material could form the basis for surgical implants with lower risk of rejection by the body.
19th January 2017

Artificial leaf as mini-factory for drugs

Artificial leaf as mini-factory for drugs
To produce drugs sustainably and cheaply, anywhere you want. Whether in the middle of the jungle or even on Mars. A 'mini-factory' whereby sunlight can be captured to make chemical products. Inspired by the art of nature where leaves are able to collect enough sunlight to produce food, chemical engineers at Eindhoven University of Technology (TU/e) have presented such a scenario. They describe their prototype reactor - consciously shaped as a leaf - in the journal Angewandte Chemie.
22nd December 2016

Pluripotent stem cells grow human intestines in a lab

Pluripotent stem cells grow human intestines in a lab
Scientists report in Nature Medicine using human pluripotent stem cells to grow human intestinal tissues that have functioning nerves in a laboratory, and then using these to recreate and study a severe intestinal nerve disorder called Hirschsprung's disease. The findings describe an unprecedented approach to engineer and study tissues in the intestine - the body's largest immune organ, its food processor and main interface with the outside world.
22nd November 2016

Researchers create living bio-hybrid system

Researchers create living bio-hybrid system
  One of the biggest challenges in cognitive or rehabilitation neurosciences is the ability to design a functional hybrid system that can connect and exchange information between biological systems, like neurons in the brain, and human-made electronic devices.
21st November 2016


Bioengineering documents


Sign up to view our publications

Sign up

Sign up to view our downloads

Sign up

PPMA Show 2017
26th September 2017
United Kingdom NEC, Birmingham
World’s top 50 innovators from the industries of the future
27th September 2017
United Kingdom London
New Scientist Live 2017
28th September 2017
United Kingdom Excel, London
Kiosk Summit 2017
28th September 2017
United Kingdom London
act! 2017
28th September 2017
Germany NHOW Berlin