Bioengineering

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Non-toxic underwater adhesive may replace sutures

Non-toxic underwater adhesive may replace sutures
A non-toxic glue modelled after adhesive proteins produced by mussels and other creatures has been found to out-perform commercially available products, pointing toward potential surgical glues to replace sutures and staples. More than 230 million major surgeries are performed worldwide each year, and over 12 million traumatic wounds are treated in the United States alone. About 60% of these wounds are closed using mechanical methods such as sutures and staples.
24th July 2017

Technology is helping UK sprinter on the road to recovery

Technology is helping UK sprinter on the road to recovery
UK Olympic sprinter James Ellington has joined forces with the UK´s Invibio Biomaterial Solutions and CarboFix Orthopedics on his road to recovery and his overall ambition to return to the world stage of athletic competition after a devastating motorcycle accident in Tenerife earlier this year. 
21st July 2017

Radiopaque glue seals bleeding and guides surgery

As open surgery has gradually been replaced by minimally-invasive and image-guided procedures, tissue adhesives are taking the place of sutures and surgical staples. With countless applications, including: bleeding embolisation, angioplasty, stent insertion, and biopsy, among others, new surgical glues are highly desired in medical clinics.
20th July 2017


Silicone heart beats almost like a human heart

Silicone heart beats almost like a human heart
  ETH researchers from the Functional Materials Laboratory have developed a silicone heart that beats almost like a human heart. In collaboration with colleagues from the Product Development Group Zurich, they have tested how well it works.
13th July 2017

Transparent heart tissue reveals hidden complexity

Transparent heart tissue reveals hidden complexity
A technique borrowed from neuroscience to see through brain tissue is helping scientists to see the fine structure of the heart. Using an existing approach, a team from Imperial has been able to turn samples of heart tissue transparent, revealing the complex networks of tiny blood vessels which supply the tissue as well as the scaffold of collagen which holds everything in place.
12th July 2017

A necessary step on road to 3D bioprinting

A necessary step on road to 3D bioprinting
  In their work toward 3D printing transplantable tissues and organs, bioengineers and scientists from Rice University and Baylor College of Medicine have demonstrated a key step on the path to generate implantable tissues with functioning capillaries.
12th July 2017

Engineering digestive system tissues in the lab

Engineering digestive system tissues in the lab
  Researchers at Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine have reached important milestones in their quest to engineer replacement tissue in the lab to treat digestive system conditions - from infants born with too-short bowels to adults with inflammatory bowel disease, colon cancer, or fecal incontinence.
5th July 2017

Artificial bile ducts developed in lab

Artificial bile ducts developed in lab
Cambridge scientists have developed a new method for growing and transplanting artificial bile ducts that could in future be used to help treat liver disease in children, reducing the need for liver transplantation. In research published in the journal Nature Medicine, the researchers grew 3D cellular structure which, once transplanted into mice, developed into normal, functioning bile ducts.
4th July 2017

Pluripotent stem cells generate lab grown human colons

Pluripotent stem cells generate lab grown human colons
Scientists used human pluripotent stem cells to generate human embryonic colons in a laboratory that function much like natural human tissues when transplanted into mice, according to research published in Cell Stem Cell. The study is believed to be the first time human colon organoids have been successfully tissue engineered in this manner, according to researchers at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center who led the project.
23rd June 2017

Can PCU improve valve function?

Can PCU improve valve function?
Pulsed cavitation ultrasound (PCU) can be used to remotely soften human degenerative calcified biosprosthetic valves and may significantly improve the valve opening function, according to a study published in JACC: Basic to Translational Science. Olivier Villemain, MD, et al., examined the effects of PCU on human bioprosthetic heart valves that were removed from patients because they were heavily calcified and were non-functional.
20th June 2017


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SPE Offshore Europe 2017
5th September 2017
United Kingdom Aberdeen Exhibition & Conference Centre
EPE 2017 ECCE Europe
11th September 2017
Poland Warsaw
ON Semiconductor Power Seminars 2017
11th September 2017
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DSEI 2017
12th September 2017
United Kingdom ExCeL, London
RWM 2017
12th September 2017
United Kingdom NEC, Birmingham