Bioengineering

Displaying 21 - 30 of 90

Wirelessly powered implants suit miniature cardiac pacing

Wirelessly powered implants suit miniature cardiac pacing
As implantable devices continue to shrink, the race is on for similarly-sized reliable power sources. Current state-of-the art implantables often depend on chunky batteries that suffer from limited lifetimes, with a typical pacemaker battery lasting around eight years. While some techniques have successfully harvested power from biological processes such as heart beats or from body heat, most devices require significantly more energy.
22nd March 2017

Plant-based 3D scaffolds can create biomedical implants

Plant-based 3D scaffolds can create biomedical implants
  Borrowing from nature is an age-old theme in science. Form and function go hand-in-hand in the natural world and the structures created by plants and animals are only rarely improved on by humans.
21st March 2017

Tethered nanoparticles make tumour cells more vulnerable

Tethered nanoparticles make tumour cells more vulnerable
MIT researchers have devised a way to make tumour cells more susceptible to certain types of cancer treatment by coating the cells with nanoparticles before delivering drugs. By tethering hundreds of tiny particles to the surfaces of tumour cells in the presence of a mechanical force, the researchers made the cells much more vulnerable to attack by a drug that triggers cancer cells to commit suicide.
21st March 2017


A big appetite for progress in edible robotics

A big appetite for progress in edible robotics
Swiss engineers have been working on an edible robot. Their work has served up a number of tech watchers commenting on the wonders of it all: The next robot, suggested writers, could be an edible item crawling through your gut. Machine actuators are the key elements in this undertaking by a team from the Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL). The research was led by graduate student Jun Shintake, said Recode.
14th March 2017

Improved tool keeps patients and doctors safe

A medical device used in more than 80% of all procedures is getting a much-needed make-over from four biomedical engineering majors. Doctors, veterinarians and other other medical personnel use electrocautery devices to remove unwanted tissue and to prevent or stop bleeding. The tool heats to 1200 degrees at the touch of a button and because it remains hot after use, the tip can accidently burn patients or the doctors, said Dev Mandavia, a student in Georgia Tech’s Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering.
14th March 2017

Growing bone for more effective injury repair

Growing bone for more effective injury repair
Clinical trials offer hope of new treatment for complicated bone injuries. Broken bones do not always repair fully, especially after major trauma such as a car accident. Complications can occur when the bone is broken in several places, the blood flow is reduced or infection sets in. Patients can suffer long-term from loss of income and disability. There is significant demand for bone regeneration.
9th March 2017

Paper pumps power portable biomedical devices

Paper pumps power portable biomedical devices
Biomedical engineering researchers from North Carolina State University and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill have developed inexpensive paper pumps that use capillary action to power portable microfluidic devices, opening the door to a range of biomedical tools. Microfluidic devices are devices that manipulate fluids which have a volume of one microliter or less - volumes substantially smaller than a single teardrop.
9th March 2017

Nanomaterials to study and repair with the brain

Nanomaterials to study and repair with the brain
An EU-funded partnership with multidisciplinary expertise has established a virtual institute that trained during the period 2011-2015 the next generation of scientists in neuroelectronics, a field that integrates advances from (nano)technology with applications in neuroscience. The brain is composed by billions of neurons, which exchange signals with each other by tiny electrical currents and voltages.
7th March 2017

Researchers suggest using robots to grow human tissue

Researchers suggest using robots to grow human tissue
A pair of biomedical researchers with Oxford University is suggesting that human-like robots might provide the best platform for growing tissue to be transplanted into human patients. In a recent issue of Science Robots, Pierre-Alexis Mouthuy and Andrew Carr offer a Focus piece outlining the way that human tissue is now grown and explain why they think moving the process to a robot would provide a better product.
3rd March 2017

Nano thread enables long-term neural implants

Nano thread enables long-term neural implants
Researcher Dr. Luan and his interdisciplinary team from the University of Texas at Austin have developed an ultra flexible nanoelectronic thread (NET) that has the potential to offer a new type of the long-term neural implants. Neural probes are used to directly measure or even stimulate electrical activity in specific regions of the brain. However, despite the many advances in the field, issues with biocompatibility have limited the prospects and usefulness of the technology.
24th February 2017


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LASER World of PHOTONICS 2017
26th June 2017
Germany Messe Munchen