Bioengineering

Displaying 11 - 20 of 147

Artificial skin allows robotic hand to sense touch

Artificial skin allows robotic hand to sense touch
A team of researchers from the University of Houston has reported a breakthrough in stretchable electronics that can serve as an artificial skin, allowing a robotic hand to sense the difference between hot and cold, while also offering advantages for a wide range of biomedical devices. The work, reported in the journal Science Advances, describes a new mechanism for producing stretchable electronics, a process that relies upon readily available materials and could be scaled up for commercial production.
14th September 2017

Microchip technology could be used to track smart pills

Microchip technology could be used to track smart pills
Researchers at Caltech have developed a prototype miniature medical device that could ultimately be used in "smart pills" to diagnose and treat diseases. A key to the new technology—and what makes it unique among other microscale medical devices—is that its location can be precisely identified within the body, something that proved challenging before.
14th September 2017

SETALUM Sealant receives CE Mark approval

SETALUM Sealant receives CE Mark approval
Gecko Biomedical has announced that it has received CE Mark approval for its SETALUM Sealant allowing the company to market its technology in Europe. The SETALUM Sealant is a biocompatible, bioresorbable and on-demand activated sealant usable in wet and dynamic environments as an add-on to sutures during vascular surgery. The polymer is applied to tissue in-situ and activated using a proprietary light activation pen.
12th September 2017


Bioengineered livers similar to natural development

Bioengineered livers similar to natural development
How do cells work together and use their genome to develop into human liver tissue? An international research team from the Max Planck Institute, headed by Prof. Barbara Treutlein from the Technical University of Munich (TUM), has applied this question by using novel technologies of genomics and stem cell research. This new research greatly advances efforts to bioengineer healthy and usable human liver tissue from human pluripotent stem cells.
4th September 2017

Five ways that 3D printing is revolutionising medicine

Five ways that 3D printing is revolutionising medicine
According to Mr Chuen, Director of Vascular Surgery at Austin Health and a Clinical Fellow at the University of Melbourne, 3D printing technology is going to transform medicine, whether it is patient-specific surgical models, custom-made prosthetics, personalised on-demand medicines, or even 3D printed human tissue. And his do-it-yourself approach has now grown into a 3D Medical Printing Laboratory at the hospital with help from the University of Melbourne’s Department of Mechanical Engineering.
29th August 2017

Self-powered ‘SPEDs’ may lead to medical-diagnostic tools

Self-powered ‘SPEDs’ may lead to medical-diagnostic tools
A new medical-diagnostic device made out of paper detects biomarkers and identifies diseases by performing electrochemical analyses - powered only by the user’s touch - and reads out the color-coded test results, making it easy for non-experts to understand. “You could consider this a portable laboratory that is just completely made out of paper, is inexpensive and can be disposed of through incineration,” said Ramses V. Martinez, an assistant professor of industrial and biomedical engineering at Purdue University.
25th August 2017

Microneedle patches successful in first human clinical trial

  Despite the potentially severe consequences of illness and even death, only about 40% of adults in the United States receive flu shots each year; however, researchers believe a new self-administered, painless vaccine skin patch containing microscopic needles could significantly increase the number of people who get vaccinated.
25th August 2017

Polymer could help lower blood glucose and weight

Polymer could help lower blood glucose and weight
Diabetes is a tough disease to manage. Oral medications, insulin shots, close monitoring of blood sugar, dietary changes and exercise can all factor into a person's treatment regimen. Now researchers are exploring a novel, simpler approach: implanting a polymer sponge into fat tissue. Their study has shown that in obese mice with symptoms resembling Type 2 diabetes, the implant reduced weight gain and blood-sugar levels—by getting the fat to 'talk' again.
22nd August 2017

3D-printed robotic arm provides sign language translation

3D-printed robotic arm provides sign language translation
A team of engineers at the University of Antwerp in The Netherlands has developed a 3D-printed robotic arm that can act as a sign language translator for deaf people. Sign language interpreters are often in short supply, and so this research team set out to develop a low cost automated system that can translate text into sign language. “A deaf person who needs to appear in court, a deaf person following a lesson in a classroom somewhere".
22nd August 2017

Killing bacteria by hacking plastics with silver and electricity

Killing bacteria by hacking plastics with silver and electricity
Researchers at the Swedish Medical Nanoscience Center at Karolinska Institutet have developed an innovative way of hacking conducting plastics so as to prevent bacterial growth using silver nanoparticles and a small electrical current. The method, which could prove to be useful in preventing bacterial infections in hospitals, is presented in the scientific journal Advanced Healthcare Materials.
17th August 2017


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