Bioengineering

Displaying 11 - 20 of 90

Graphene changes stem cells for nerve regrowth

Graphene changes stem cells for nerve regrowth
Researchers looking for ways to regenerate nerves can have a hard time obtaining key tools of their trade. Schwann cells are an example. They form sheaths around axons, the tail-like parts of nerve cells that carry electrical impulses. They promote regeneration of those axons. And they secrete substances that promote the health of nerve cells. In other words, they’re very useful to researchers hoping to regenerate nerve cells, specifically peripheral nerve cells, those cells outside the brain and spinal cord.
26th April 2017

3D-printed patch helps mend a broken heart

3D-printed patch helps mend a broken heart
A team of biomedical engineering researchers, led by the University of Minnesota, has created a revolutionary 3D-bioprinted patch that can help heal scarred heart tissue after a heart attack. The discovery is a major step forward in treating patients with tissue damage after a heart attack. The research study is published in Circulation Research, a journal published by the American Heart Association. Researchers have filed a patent on the discovery.
25th April 2017

3D printed cartilage mimics features of knee’s meniscus

3D printed cartilage mimics features of knee’s meniscus
Worn out cartilage in the knees is a major cause of disability and once it’s worn out there’s nothing ideally suited to replace it. Osteoarthritis develops,and eventually much of the entire knee is often replaced, with variable success. Researchers at Duke University have been working on creating a material that can serve as a cartilage replacement and they have already developed something at least as strong and pliable as the cartilage making up the knee’s meniscus.
24th April 2017


Software could 3D print organ replicas on demand

Software could 3D print organ replicas on demand
Erica Endicott was pregnant with her son, Kaden, when cardiologists at Phoenix Children’s Heart Center discovered that the left side of the boy’s heart was not growing properly. Kaden, who is healthy now, was treated by a team of doctors in Boston for the life-threatening condition. Following the procedure, they used data from an ultrasound system to create and print 3D models of Kaden’s heart before and after his surgery.
19th April 2017

Stretching the limits of neural implants

Stretching the limits of neural implants
Implantable fibres have been an enormous boon to brain research, allowing scientists to stimulate specific targets in the brain and monitor electrical responses. But similar studies in the nerves of the spinal cord, which might ultimately lead to treatments to alleviate spinal cord injuries, have been more difficult to carry out. That’s because the spine flexes and stretches as the body moves, and the relatively stiff, brittle fibres used today could damage the delicate spinal cord tissue.
3rd April 2017

Text-mining tool turbocharges biomedical pursuits

Text-mining tool turbocharges biomedical pursuits
With about 100 lines of code, a Morgridge Institute for Research team has unleashed a fast, simple and predictive text-mining tool that may turbocharge big biomedical pursuits such as drug repurposing and stem cell treatments. The algorithm, named “KinderMiner” by its inventors, has been put to use exploring one of the largest single archives of research journal papers, Europe PubMed Central.
30th March 2017

3D printing produces model blood vessels

3D printing produces model blood vessels
Creating model blood vessels to aid in the study of diseases, such as strokes, can be complicated, costly and time-consuming. And the results may not always be truly representative of a human vessel. Assistant Professor Pranav Soman and his research team have engineered a new method to create model blood vessels that is more efficient, less expensive and more exact.
27th March 2017

'Synthetic skin' could lead to advanced prosthetic limbs

'Synthetic skin' could lead to advanced prosthetic limbs
Engineers from the University of Glasgow, who have previously developed an 'electronic skin' covering for prosthetic hands made from graphene, have found a way to use some of graphene's remarkable physical properties to use energy from the sun to power the skin. Graphene is a highly flexible form of graphite which, despite being just a single atom thick, is stronger than steel, electrically conductive, and transparent.
23rd March 2017

Artificial lung works as bridge to transplants

Artificial lung works as bridge to transplants
Each year, nearly 350,000 Americans die of some form of lung disease, with another 150,000 patients needing short- and long-term care. Unfortunately, current breathing-support technologies are cumbersome, often requiring patients to be bedridden and sedated. Now, with the support of a $3.4 million National Institutes of Health grant, researchers at the University of Pittsburgh will develop an artificial lung to serve as a bridge to transplant or recovery in patients with acute and chronic lung failure.
23rd March 2017

Engineer aims to grow spinal tissue in lab

Engineer aims to grow spinal tissue in lab
For a soldier who suffered a spinal cord injury on the battlefield, the promise of regenerative medicine is to fully repair the resulting limb paralysis. But that hope is still years from reality. Not only powerful, but efficient. Studying diseases in lab-created tissue may help reduce the price tag — now roughly $1.8 billion — for bringing a new drug to market, which is one of the reasons Ashton received a National Science Foundation CAREER Award for advancing tissue engineering of the human spinal cord.
22nd March 2017


Bioengineering documents


Sign up to view our publications

Sign up

Sign up to view our downloads

Sign up

LASER World of PHOTONICS 2017
26th June 2017
Germany Messe Munchen