Bioengineering

Displaying 11 - 20 of 130

Adhesive remains tough and resilient when wet

Adhesive remains tough and resilient when wet
  A team of researchers from the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering and the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) has created a super-strong 'tough adhesive' that is biocompatible and binds to tissues with a strength comparable to the body’s own resilient cartilage, even when they’re wet.
2nd August 2017

Porcine gastric molecule creates coating for contact lenses

Porcine gastric molecule creates coating for contact lenses
After a long day of working at the computer, scratchy contact lenses are not only painful, over longer periods of time they can also damage ocular tissue. Relief may be in sight from a natural mucus component referred to as a mucin. A team from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has now succeeded in demonstrating that contact lenses coated with purified porcine gastric mucin do not cause damage to the eye anymore.
1st August 2017

Antibiotic-releasing polymer to prevent joint implant infection

Antibiotic-releasing polymer to prevent joint implant infection
A team of Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) investigators has developed an antibiotic-releasing polymer that may greatly simplify the treatment of prosthetic joint infection. In their recent report published in Nature Biomedical Engineering, the researchers describe how implants made from this material successfully eliminated two types of prosthetic infection in animal models.
31st July 2017


Nanomaterials for A.I. retina receive $7 million grant

Nanomaterials for A.I. retina receive $7 million grant
A future android brain like that of Star Trek’s Commander Data might contain neuristors, multi-circuit components that emulate the firings of human neurons. Neuristors already exist today in labs, in small quantities, and to fuel the quest to boost neuristors’ power and numbers for practical use in brain-like computing, the U.S. Department of Defense has awarded a $7.1 million grant to a research team led by the Georgia Institute of Technology.
31st July 2017

Baker's yeast to aid drug development

Baker's yeast to aid drug development
A team of Canadian, U.S. and Japanese scientists are enlisting baker’s yeast in a hunt for better drugs. A new method developed by U of T researchers and international collaborators has the potential to accelerate drug discovery with help from yeast cells. They are simpler versions of human cells and better understood when it comes to basic cellular processes – helping researchers better link a drug to a particular bioprocess.
28th July 2017

3D printed organs have some way to go

3D printed organs have some way to go
A recent report from IDTechEx Research states that regenerative medicine will be the biggest growth market for 3D bioprinting. However, while using the technology for the replacement of damaged and failing organs is far more advanced than being purely a fantasy based in the realms of science fiction, the report suggest there are some hurdles to making the technology a significant player in the market, and it may be some years before it can realise its potential.
27th July 2017

Behold the mutant ninja living cells!

Behold the mutant ninja living cells!
In new research, Alex Green, a professor at ASU's Biodesign Institute, demonstrates how living cells can be induced to carry out computations in the manner of tiny robots or computers. The results of the study have significant implications for intelligent drug design and smart drug delivery, green energy production, low-cost diagnostic technologies and even the development of futuristic nanomachines capable of hunting down cancer cells or switching off aberrant genes.
27th July 2017

Bioengineered liver tissue expands after transplant

Bioengineered liver tissue expands after transplant
Many diseases, including cirrhosis and hepatitis, can lead to liver failure. More than 17,000 Americans suffering from these diseases are now waiting for liver transplants, but significantly fewer livers are available. To help address that shortage, researchers at MIT, Rockefeller University, and Boston University have developed a new way to engineer liver tissue, by organising tiny subunits that contain three types of cells embedded into a biodegradable tissue scaffold.
27th July 2017

Helping patients comply with treatment regimens

Helping patients comply with treatment regimens
Around half of all medications for chronic diseases are not taken as prescribed, costing the U.S. health care system more than $100 billion in avoidable hospital stays each year. This noncompliance is even more significant in the developing world, where health care budgets are chronically overstretched and patients treated for diseases such as malaria must take multiple drugs with complex dose regimens.
27th July 2017

Microscopic silk cocoons may facilitate drug design

Microscopic silk cocoons may facilitate drug design
  Scientists have managed to design microscopic silk capsules that mimic, on a very small scale, the structure of silkworm cocoons. The capsules can serve as a protective environment for the transport of sensitive “cargo” such as natural silk proteins, antibodies or other delicate molecules.
27th July 2017


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SPE Offshore Europe 2017
5th September 2017
United Kingdom Aberdeen Exhibition & Conference Centre
EPE 2017 ECCE Europe
11th September 2017
Poland Warsaw
ON Semiconductor Power Seminars 2017
11th September 2017
United Kingdom
DSEI 2017
12th September 2017
United Kingdom ExCeL, London
RWM 2017
12th September 2017
United Kingdom NEC, Birmingham