Bioengineering

Displaying 11 - 20 of 177

Modified blood stem cells reverse diabetes in mice

Modified blood stem cells reverse diabetes in mice
Researchers at Boston Children's Hospital have successfully reversed type 1 diabetes in a mouse model by infusing blood stem cells pre-treated to produce more of a protein called PD-L1, which is deficient in mice (and people) with type 1 diabetes. The cells curbed the autoimmune reaction in cells from both mice and humans and reversed hyperglycemia in diabetic mice. Findings were published in Science Translational Medicine.
16th November 2017

One step closer to the artificial heart

One step closer to the artificial heart
An artificial heart would be an absolute lifesaver for people with cardiac failure. However, to recreate the complex organ in the laboratory, one would first need to work out how to grow multi-layered, living tissues. Researchers at Empa have now come one step closer to this goal: by means of a spraying process, they have created functioning muscle fibres.
15th November 2017

Nanoshells could deliver chemo with fewer side effects

Nanoshells could deliver chemo with fewer side effects
Researchers investigating ways to deliver high doses of cancer-killing drugs inside tumours have shown they can use a laser and light-activated gold nanoparticles to remotely trigger the release of approved cancer drugs inside cancer cells in laboratory cultures. The study by researchers at Rice University and Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine appears in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
10th November 2017


Boy is given new skin thanks to gene therapy

Boy is given new skin thanks to gene therapy
A medical team at the Ruhr-Universität Bochum's burn unit and the Center for Regenerative Medicine at the University of Modena (Italy) were the first ever to successfully treat a child suffering from extensive skin damage using transplants derived from genetically modified stem cells. The boy is a so-called butterfly child: he suffers from epidermolysis bullosa, a genetic skin disease that had destroyed approximately 80% of his epidermis.
9th November 2017

A recipe to make human blood-brain barrier

A recipe to make human blood-brain barrier
  A critical anatomical structure, the barrier is the brain’s first and most comprehensive line of defense. But in addition to protecting the brain, it also is involved in disease and effectively blocks many of the small-molecule drugs that might make effective therapies for a host of neurological conditions, including such things as stroke, trauma and cancer.
9th November 2017

Model reveals possibility of pumping antibiotics into bacteria

Model reveals possibility of pumping antibiotics into bacteria
Researchers in the University of Wisconsin–Madison Department of Biochemistry have discovered that a cellular pump known to move drugs like antibiotics out of E. coli bacteria has the potential to bring them in as well, opening lines of research into combating the bacteria. The discovery could rewrite almost 50 years of thinking about how these types of transporters function in the cell.
8th November 2017

Transforming fibrils into crystals

Transforming fibrils into crystals
Amyloid fibrils are infamous for the role they play in serious neurological diseases in humans, such as Parkinson’s or Alzheimer’s. One trigger for Alzheimer’s disease is the misfolding and aggregation of proteins such as tau and ABeta. This causes the formation of tiny fibrils that then accumulate in the brain. Specialists refer to these fibres as amyloid fibrils.
7th November 2017

Nano-sized gold particles can behave as clones

Nano-sized gold particles can behave as clones
  Shaping nanometric gold particles - of the size of millionths of a millimeter - to improve their properties in biomedicine and photonics has been made possible thanks to a special laser system in a work carried out at the Universidad Complutense de Madrid (UCM) and now published in Science.
6th November 2017

Making fluorescent chips with an inkjet printer

Making fluorescent chips with an inkjet printer
Want to quickly test blood for pathogens? Or food for toxins? In the future, you will be able to do just that from the comfort of your own home using a small fluorescent chip and your smartphone. To make use of this method, you require a lamp and a detector – and now these could potentially be printed in large quantities using an inkjet printer. Fraunhofer IOF researchers will be showcasing the technique at the Compamed trade fair (Hall 8a, Booth P13), to be held in Düsseldorf from November 13th-16th.
6th November 2017

Elucidation of bone regeneration mechanism

Elucidation of bone regeneration mechanism
Fish have the extraordinary ability to regenerate lost fins and other appendages containing cartilage and bone. The cells responsible for the regeneration offer new clues on how to regenerate tissues in humans. Researchers at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) have found a dormant progenitor cell population in zebrafish that regenerates bone cells, or osteoblasts. The study can be read in Developmental Cell.
6th November 2017


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