Bioengineering

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Visual Assistant for the visually impaired

Visual Assistant for the visually impaired
The Visual Assistant has been designed to help visually impaired users to adapt the presentation of the outside world optimally to the working parts of their visual system. This allows them to understand and interpret what is in front of them, whether this is a TV, smartphone, tablet, or when navigating in buildings or outdoor environments.
5th September 2016

Tool mimics cells' ability to stretch and compress

Tool mimics cells' ability to stretch and compress
A tool developed at EPFL can stretch and compress cells, mimicking what happens in the body. The aim: to study the role played by these mechanical forces in cases of cancer or lymphatic diseases. Complex mechanical forces are constantly at work in the human body, deforming our cells. In our blood vessel walls, for example, cells are stretched approximately once per second by the pulsing blood flow.
5th September 2016

Cyborg beast, phoenix, talon: 3D printed devices

Cyborg beast, phoenix, talon: 3D printed devices
  Cyborg beast, phoenix, talon — although these names seem fitting for superhero characters, they are actually names for devices that make people feel like superheroes. These devices are 3D-printed hands that are designed for people who live without all or part of their arms.
2nd September 2016


Protein engineering techniques design ultrasound tools

Protein engineering techniques design ultrasound tools
Ultrasound imaging is used around the world to help visualise developing babies and diagnose disease. Sound waves bounce off the tissues, revealing their different densities and shapes. The next step in ultrasound technology is to image not just anatomy, but specific cells and molecules deeper in the body, such as those associated with tumors or bacteria in our gut. A study from Caltech outlines how protein engineering techniques might help achieve this milestone.
25th August 2016

Smart implants to counter post-operative infection

Smart implants to counter post-operative infection
  Innovate UK is providing funding to support the next stage in development of a bio-active implant, Smart Spacer, which will counter post-operative infection following knee surgery. The programme has the potential to substantially reduce the £300m that these complications cost the NHS.
23rd August 2016

Injectable gels could prevent future heart failure

Injectable gels could prevent future heart failure
During a heart attack, clots or narrowed arteries block blood flow, harming or killing cells within the tissue. But the damage doesn't end after the crushing pain subsides. Instead, the heart's walls thin out, the organ becomes enlarged, and scar tissue forms. If nothing is done, the patient can eventually experience heart failure. But scientists now report they have developed gels that, in animal tests, can be injected into the heart to shore up weakened areas and prevent heart failure.
22nd August 2016

Continuous coil wires enable epilepsy control brain implant

Continuous coil wires enable epilepsy control brain implant
Epilepsy, a neurological condition that causes repeated seizures also known as fits, can occur in people anywhere and at any time without warning. Neurone cells use electrical impulses to communicate with each other and during a fit, the electrical impulses in the brain are disrupted. 
22nd August 2016

Paper-based device spots falsified or degraded medications

Paper-based device spots falsified or degraded medications
The developing world is awash in substandard, degraded or falsified medications, which can either directly harm users or deprive them of needed treatment. And with internet sales of medications on the rise, people everywhere are increasingly at risk. So, a team of researchers has developed a simple, inexpensive paper-based device to screen suspicious medications. The researchers will present their work at the 252nd National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS).
22nd August 2016

Compounds could prevent scars from forming

Compounds could prevent scars from forming
Most people start racking up scars from an early age with scraped knees and elbows. While many of these fade over time, more severe types such as keloids and scars from burns are largely untreatable. These types of scars are associated with permanent functional loss and, in severe cases, carry the stigma of disfigurement. Now scientists are developing new compounds that could stop scars from forming in the first place.
22nd August 2016

Software could accurately predict structure of a drug

A Purdue-based startup is developing molecular modelling simulation software that could help pharmaceutical companies more accurately predict the crystal structure of a drug once produced, helping maintain a consistent drug quality and save costs when developing new drugs. Lyudmila Slipchenko, associate professor in Purdue's Department of Chemistry, and Pradeep Kumar Gurunathan, a graduate student in chemistry, co-founded the company Simplexity Simulations LLC to commercialise the software.
18th August 2016


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