Bioengineering

Displaying 1 - 10 of 128

Killing bacteria by hacking plastics with silver and electricity

Killing bacteria by hacking plastics with silver and electricity
Researchers at the Swedish Medical Nanoscience Center at Karolinska Institutet have developed an innovative way of hacking conducting plastics so as to prevent bacterial growth using silver nanoparticles and a small electrical current. The method, which could prove to be useful in preventing bacterial infections in hospitals, is presented in the scientific journal Advanced Healthcare Materials.
17th August 2017

The latest method for the 3D printing of living tissues

The latest method for the 3D printing of living tissues
  Scientists at the University of Oxford have developed a new method to 3D-print laboratory- grown cells to form living structures. The approach could revolutionise regenerative medicine, enabling the production of complex tissues and cartilage that would potentially support, repair or augment diseased and damaged areas of the body.
15th August 2017

Injectable tissue patch helps repair damaged organs

Injectable tissue patch helps repair damaged organs
A team of U of T Engineering researchers is mending broken hearts with an expanding tissue bandage a little smaller than a postage stamp. Repairing heart tissue destroyed by a heart attack or medical condition with regenerative cells or tissues usually requires invasive open-heart surgery. But now biomedical engineering Professor Milica Radisic and her colleagues have developed a technique that lets them use a small needle to inject a repair patch, without the need to open up the chest cavity.
15th August 2017


Microbot origami captures and transports single cells

Microbot origami captures and transports single cells
Researchers at North Carolina State University and Duke University have developed a way to assemble and pre-program tiny structures made from microscopic cubes – “microbot origami” – to change their shape when actuated by a magnetic field and then, using the magnetic energy from their environment, perform a variety of tasks – including capturing and transporting single cells.
14th August 2017

‘Origami organs’ could regenerate tissues

Northwestern Medicine scientists and engineers have invented a range of bioactive 'tissue papers' made of materials derived from organs that are thin and flexible enough to even fold into an origami bird. The new biomaterials can potentially be used to support natural hormone production in young cancer patients and aid wound healing. The tissue papers are made from structural proteins excreted by cells that give organs their form and structure.
8th August 2017

Smart hydrogels could contribute to biomedical applications

Smart hydrogels could contribute to biomedical applications
A research team led by Prof SUN Fei, Assistant Professor of Chemical & Biological Engineering at The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST), has created a new protein-based stimuli-responsive smart hydrogel that could open doors for future material biology and biomedical applications. Hydrogels, also known as soft matter in the medical world, are leading materials for biomedical applications such as drug delivery and stem cell therapy.
7th August 2017

Biosensor stimulates sweat even when patient is cool

Biosensor stimulates sweat even when patient is cool
  One downside to medical sensors that test human sweat: you have to sweat. Sweating from exertion or a stifling room temperature can be impractical for some patients and unsafe for others. And unless they are on the second leg of the Tour de France, it's unlikely patients will want to sweat all day for the benefit of a sensor reading.
7th August 2017

3D printing to help train surgeons and shorten surgery times

3D printing to help train surgeons and shorten surgery times
A team of engineers and pediatric orthopedic surgeons are using 3D printing to help train surgeons and shorten surgeries for the most common hip disorder found in children ages 9 to 16. In a recent study, researchers showed that allowing surgeons to prep on a 3D-printed model of the patient's hip joint cut by about 25% the amount of time needed for surgery when compared to a control group.
2nd August 2017

Adhesive remains tough and resilient when wet

Adhesive remains tough and resilient when wet
  A team of researchers from the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering and the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) has created a super-strong 'tough adhesive' that is biocompatible and binds to tissues with a strength comparable to the body’s own resilient cartilage, even when they’re wet.
2nd August 2017

Porcine gastric molecule creates coating for contact lenses

Porcine gastric molecule creates coating for contact lenses
After a long day of working at the computer, scratchy contact lenses are not only painful, over longer periods of time they can also damage ocular tissue. Relief may be in sight from a natural mucus component referred to as a mucin. A team from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has now succeeded in demonstrating that contact lenses coated with purified porcine gastric mucin do not cause damage to the eye anymore.
1st August 2017


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SPE Offshore Europe 2017
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EPE 2017 ECCE Europe
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RWM 2017
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